Zodiacal light over the Pacific


Roland Christen
 

My latest entry at Astrobin:

https://www.astrobin.com/full/0ueuhs/0/?nc=Uncarollo

Back in April Marj and I visited Hawaii Island for a short vacation. We had some very clear nights with bright Milky Way overhead, and I did some observing with friends and neighbors with our 175 refractor. Someone mentioned that Saturn was her favorite planet because it has rings. I added that actually many of the planets had rings, including our Earth. I had them look west over the Pacific where the Zodiacal light rose straight up, reaching overhead into the Milky way. I explained that this is a ring of dust that is being illuminated by the sun, and we can see it every night after sunset in this pristine sky.

I was able to capture it on the following night with my 12mm Rokinon lens on my little Sony camera. It took a number of tries because some images were ruined by airplanes in their decent towards the Kona airport. But eventually I got five 30 second exposures that i combined in this shot.

I also spent quite a few nights getting acquainted with the southern skies using both 100mm binoculars and our 175 refractor. No imaging, just visual the way people used to look at the skies. Down here in the south Pacific, one can see Omega Centauri quite high up, and easily see the Carina Nebula and other deep sky objects in that part of the sky. I eventually went to bed as the Scorpion rose over Mauna Kea and the gibbous Moon appeared over the top of Kohala mountain. From my observatory I have a view of 5 volcanoes - Mauna Kea, Mauna Loa, Hualalai, Kohala, and Maui's Haleakala.

Rolando


Alan
 

Rolando,

Very nice! And what a great view.

Clear skies, Alan

On 4/27/2021 8:47 PM, Roland Christen via groups.io wrote:
My latest entry at Astrobin:


Back in April Marj and I visited Hawaii Island for a short vacation. We had some very clear nights with bright Milky Way overhead, and I did some observing with friends and neighbors with our 175 refractor. Someone mentioned that Saturn was her favorite planet because it has rings. I added that actually many of the planets had rings, including our Earth. I had them look west over the Pacific where the Zodiacal light rose straight up, reaching overhead into the Milky way. I explained that this is a ring of dust that is being illuminated by the sun, and we can see it every night after sunset in this pristine sky.

I was able to capture it on the following night with my 12mm Rokinon lens on my little Sony camera. It took a number of tries because some images were ruined by airplanes in their decent towards the Kona airport. But eventually I got five 30 second exposures that i combined in this shot.

I also spent quite a few nights getting acquainted with the southern skies using both 100mm binoculars and our 175 refractor. No imaging, just visual the way people used to look at the skies. Down here in the south Pacific, one can see Omega Centauri quite high up, and easily see the Carina Nebula and other deep sky objects in that part of the sky. I eventually went to bed as the Scorpion rose over Mauna Kea and the gibbous Moon appeared over the top of Kohala mountain. From my observatory I have a view of 5 volcanoes - Mauna Kea, Mauna Loa, Hualalai, Kohala, and Maui's Haleakala.

Rolando


Steve Armen
 

Now that's a dark sky. I've not seen even a hint of Zodiacal Light here in desert East County San Diego where we observe, ever in 20 years. 


On Tue, Apr 27, 2021 at 5:48 PM Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
My latest entry at Astrobin:


Back in April Marj and I visited Hawaii Island for a short vacation. We had some very clear nights with bright Milky Way overhead, and I did some observing with friends and neighbors with our 175 refractor. Someone mentioned that Saturn was her favorite planet because it has rings. I added that actually many of the planets had rings, including our Earth. I had them look west over the Pacific where the Zodiacal light rose straight up, reaching overhead into the Milky way. I explained that this is a ring of dust that is being illuminated by the sun, and we can see it every night after sunset in this pristine sky.

I was able to capture it on the following night with my 12mm Rokinon lens on my little Sony camera. It took a number of tries because some images were ruined by airplanes in their decent towards the Kona airport. But eventually I got five 30 second exposures that i combined in this shot.

I also spent quite a few nights getting acquainted with the southern skies using both 100mm binoculars and our 175 refractor. No imaging, just visual the way people used to look at the skies. Down here in the south Pacific, one can see Omega Centauri quite high up, and easily see the Carina Nebula and other deep sky objects in that part of the sky. I eventually went to bed as the Scorpion rose over Mauna Kea and the gibbous Moon appeared over the top of Kohala mountain. From my observatory I have a view of 5 volcanoes - Mauna Kea, Mauna Loa, Hualalai, Kohala, and Maui's Haleakala.

Rolando


ROBERT WYNNE
 

You lucky dog. I once considered a Kohala address. But thought I would never get the benefit of it due the press of work. -Best, Robert

On 04/27/2021 5:47 PM Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...> wrote:
 
 
My latest entry at Astrobin:
 
https://www.astrobin.com/full/0ueuhs/0/?nc=Uncarollo
 
Back in April Marj and I visited Hawaii Island for a short vacation. We had some very clear nights with bright Milky Way overhead, and I did some observing with friends and neighbors with our 175 refractor. Someone mentioned that Saturn was her favorite planet because it has rings. I added that actually many of the planets had rings, including our Earth. I had them look west over the Pacific where the Zodiacal light rose straight up, reaching overhead into the Milky way. I explained that this is a ring of dust that is being illuminated by the sun, and we can see it every night after sunset in this pristine sky.
 
I was able to capture it on the following night with my 12mm Rokinon lens on my little Sony camera. It took a number of tries because some images were ruined by airplanes in their decent towards the Kona airport. But eventually I got five 30 second exposures that i combined in this shot.
 
I also spent quite a few nights getting acquainted with the southern skies using both 100mm binoculars and our 175 refractor. No imaging, just visual the way people used to look at the skies. Down here in the south Pacific, one can see Omega Centauri quite high up, and easily see the Carina Nebula and other deep sky objects in that part of the sky. I eventually went to bed as the Scorpion rose over Mauna Kea and the gibbous Moon appeared over the top of Kohala mountain. From my observatory I have a view of 5 volcanoes - Mauna Kea, Mauna Loa, Hualalai, Kohala, and Maui's Haleakala.
 
Rolando


deitzelj
 

On Tue, Apr 27, 2021 at 05:47 PM, Roland Christen wrote:
ttps://www.astrobin.com/full/0ueuhs/0/?nc=Uncaroll
One of the most amazing experiences in my life was an evening spent at the 9000 ft visitor center on Mauna Kea back in April of 2004.  I have never seen anything like it in my life, not even in rural Ohio as a kid.  The sky was so full of stars that you had to look twice to pick out familiar asterisms.  The bucket of the Big Dipper had STARS in it!   I am lucky to see all the stars in the handle from my back yard.  A little after midnight the center of the Milky Way came out from behind the mountain.  It was a burning orb like in pictures.  It was actually international astronomy day at that time, and the center a bunch of very nice scopes set out including a 16 inch Cat that Meade had just donated to the local club, but all I remember is just staring at the skies with the optics God gave me.  Some day I want to take my kids to see that.  Thanks for sharing the wonderful image.

Cheers!

JMD


Jay Freeman
 

i had a similar experience at the Visitor's Center when I went there in late May / early June of 2000, with a 10-inch portable Dobson I had built for the trip. The morning zodiacal  light was so bright I thought dawn was coming two hours too soon. 

-- Jay Reynolds Freeman
---------------------
Jay_Reynolds_Freeman@...
http://JayReynoldsFreeman.com
(personal web site)

On Apr 27, 2021, at 9:00 PM, deitzelj via groups.io <deitzelj@...> wrote:

On Tue, Apr 27, 2021 at 05:47 PM, Roland Christen wrote:
ttps://www.astrobin.com/full/0ueuhs/0/?nc=Uncaroll
One of the most amazing experiences in my life was an evening spent at the 9000 ft visitor center on Mauna Kea back in April of 2004. [...]


Ross Elkins
 

Very dramatic shot Rolando! I wonder if any nasa pics have caught Earths ring? Well lets search! 
Ok here we are within Saturns rings upper left dot, thats a start! 
Another


Then we have this artists impression

Here’s the first picture of Earth from space taken in 1946 with a German V2 rocket but no rings…

And here’s the earth and moon from vicinity of Mercury! There’s also a number of Blue Marbles out there but Sorry, no rings! 


Chris Cook
 

Were you able to see the Gegenschein as well?
 
Chris
 


 

----- Original Message -----
From: Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...>
Reply-To: <main@ap-ug.groups.io>
To: <main@ap-gto.groups.io>, <main@ap-ug.groups.io>
Sent: 4/27/2021 8:47:48 PM
Subject: [ap-ug] Zodiacal light over the Pacific

My latest entry at Astrobin:

https://www.astrobin.com/full/0ueuhs/0/?nc=Uncarollo

Back in April Marj and I visited Hawaii Island for a short vacation. We had some very clear nights with bright Milky Way overhead, and I did some observing with friends and neighbors with our 175 refractor. Someone mentioned that Saturn was her favorite planet because it has rings. I added that actually many of the planets had rings, including our Earth. I had them look west over the Pacific where the Zodiacal light rose straight up, reaching overhead into the Milky way. I explained that this is a ring of dust that is being illuminated by the sun, and we can see it every night after sunset in this pristine sky.

I was able to capture it on the following night with my 12mm Rokinon lens on my little Sony camera. It took a number of tries because some images were ruined by airplanes in their decent towards the Kona airport. But eventually I got five 30 second exposures that i combined in this shot.

I also spent quite a few nights getting acquainted with the southern skies using both 100mm binoculars and our 175 refractor. No imaging, just visual the way people used to look at the skies. Down here in the south Pacific, one can see Omega Centauri quite high up, and easily see the Carina Nebula and other deep sky objects in that part of the sky. I eventually went to bed as the Scorpion rose over Mauna Kea and the gibbous Moon appeared over the top of Kohala mountain. From my observatory I have a view of 5 volcanoes - Mauna Kea, Mauna Loa, Hualalai, Kohala, and Maui's Haleakala.

Rolando


M Hambrick
 

Great picture Roland

When we rented your Hawaii house for a week a couple years ago it was cloudy and rainy the first night we were there, so I didn't bother to set up my gear and went to bed.

Big mistake ! I woke up at about 3:30 am and it had stopped raining, so I went outside to check the sky and saw what I first thought were clouds coming in from over the mountain. After a few seconds I realized that it was not clouds but the Milky Way above Saggitarius. It was amazing !

Mike


Roland Christen
 

I have seen the Gegenschein from the 9000ft elevation on Mauna Kea. I cannot see it from my observatory since Kohala mountain is in the way (approx 5000ft elevation). The observatory is located on the lower slopes of the mountain.

Rolando

-----Original Message-----
From: Chris Cook <chris@...>
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io <main@ap-ug.groups.io>
Sent: Wed, Apr 28, 2021 8:15 am
Subject: Re: [ap-ug] Zodiacal light over the Pacific

Were you able to see the Gegenschein as well?
 
Chris
 


 
----- Original Message -----
From: Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...>
Reply-To: <main@ap-ug.groups.io>
To: <main@ap-gto.groups.io>, <main@ap-ug.groups.io>
Sent: 4/27/2021 8:47:48 PM
Subject: [ap-ug] Zodiacal light over the Pacific

My latest entry at Astrobin:

https://www.astrobin.com/full/0ueuhs/0/?nc=Uncarollo

Back in April Marj and I visited Hawaii Island for a short vacation. We had some very clear nights with bright Milky Way overhead, and I did some observing with friends and neighbors with our 175 refractor. Someone mentioned that Saturn was her favorite planet because it has rings. I added that actually many of the planets had rings, including our Earth. I had them look west over the Pacific where the Zodiacal light rose straight up, reaching overhead into the Milky way. I explained that this is a ring of dust that is being illuminated by the sun, and we can see it every night after sunset in this pristine sky.

I was able to capture it on the following night with my 12mm Rokinon lens on my little Sony camera. It took a number of tries because some images were ruined by airplanes in their decent towards the Kona airport. But eventually I got five 30 second exposures that i combined in this shot.

I also spent quite a few nights getting acquainted with the southern skies using both 100mm binoculars and our 175 refractor. No imaging, just visual the way people used to look at the skies. Down here in the south Pacific, one can see Omega Centauri quite high up, and easily see the Carina Nebula and other deep sky objects in that part of the sky. I eventually went to bed as the Scorpion rose over Mauna Kea and the gibbous Moon appeared over the top of Kohala mountain. From my observatory I have a view of 5 volcanoes - Mauna Kea, Mauna Loa, Hualalai, Kohala, and Maui's Haleakala.

Rolando


ROBERT WYNNE
 

Funny how you can be drenched in Mauka showers one minute and clear skies the next. -Best, Robert

On 04/28/2021 6:30 AM M Hambrick <mhambrick563@...> wrote:
 
 
Great picture Roland

When we rented your Hawaii house for a week a couple years ago it was cloudy and rainy the first night we were there, so I didn't bother to set up my gear and went to bed.

Big mistake ! I woke up at about 3:30 am and it had stopped raining, so I went outside to check the sky and saw what I first thought were clouds coming in from over the mountain. After a few seconds I realized that it was not clouds but the Milky Way above Saggitarius. It was amazing !

Mike


 

Mike,

 

That’s why we call our home Hale Lalani Hoku (House of the Milky Way). 😊  A lovely sight, indeed.

 

Clear Skies,

Marj Christen

Astro-Physics

11250 Forest Hills Road

Machesney Park, IL 61115

Phone: 815-282-1513

www.astro-physics.com

 

From: main@ap-ug.groups.io <main@ap-ug.groups.io> On Behalf Of M Hambrick
Sent: Wednesday, April 28, 2021 8:31 AM
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-ug] Zodiacal light over the Pacific

 

Great picture Roland

When we rented your Hawaii house for a week a couple years ago it was cloudy and rainy the first night we were there, so I didn't bother to set up my gear and went to bed.

Big mistake ! I woke up at about 3:30 am and it had stopped raining, so I went outside to check the sky and saw what I first thought were clouds coming in from over the mountain. After a few seconds I realized that it was not clouds but the Milky Way above Saggitarius. It was amazing !

Mike