Jwst image of Proxima Centauri


Richard Crisp
 

Another amazing image from the JWST: 4.2 L-y distant

Remarkable surface detail. It almost looks like it’s boiling.

image0.jpeg

No wait: it’s actually a slice of Chorizo 

Evidently even scientists sometimes have a sense of humor. 





“Corrected” by my iPhone


M Hambrick
 

A couple months ago someone on Cloudy Nights posted a link to an article claiming to show telescope images of a nearby exoplanet. I don't remember any details (telescope, stellar system, etc), but the "image" of the exoplanet showed it in the partial (about 1/2 full) phase. I thought to myself, "Wow ! That must be a powerful telescope to be able to see an exoplanet in the partial phase."

I challenged that this "image" might have been an artist's rendering instead of a real image. The article and all traces of that post were pulled from the forum in less than an hour.

On a more serious note, has Hubble, JWST, or any earthbound telescope ever been able to actually resolve the disk of a star other than the Sun ? I once calculated what the angular diameter of Arcturus would be if it were the same distance as Proxima Centauri and got something like 0.001 Arc-seconds. 

It is probably a safe bet to say that at least for our hobby, the classical physics definition of all stars as point sources of light is safe for some time to come. Unless maybe Roland decides to make a 1-meter diameter APO scope :>)

Mike


Arun
 

Yes, the disc of Antares has been resolved using Earth based telescopes:

https://www.eso.org/public/news/eso1726/


Jeff Rothstein
 

Monsieur Klein has acknowledged that this was a prank. That photo is not Proxima Centauri, it is a piece of Spanish chorizo.  https://www.cnn.com/2022/08/05/europe/scientist-space-image-chorizo-intl-scli-scn/index.html


Richard Crisp
 

Yes, that information was contained within the article linked in the original posting.

 

 

 

From: main@ap-ug.groups.io <main@ap-ug.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jeff Rothstein
Sent: Saturday, August 6, 2022 7:37 PM
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-ug] Jwst image of Proxima Centauri

 

Monsieur Klein has acknowledged that this was a prank. That photo is not Proxima Centauri, it is a piece of Spanish chorizo.  https://www.cnn.com/2022/08/05/europe/scientist-space-image-chorizo-intl-scli-scn/index.html


Jeff B
 

So funny really.


On Sat, Aug 6, 2022 at 11:51 PM Richard Crisp <rdcrisp@...> wrote:

Yes, that information was contained within the article linked in the original posting.

 

 

 

From: main@ap-ug.groups.io <main@ap-ug.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jeff Rothstein
Sent: Saturday, August 6, 2022 7:37 PM
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-ug] Jwst image of Proxima Centauri

 

Monsieur Klein has acknowledged that this was a prank. That photo is not Proxima Centauri, it is a piece of Spanish chorizo.  https://www.cnn.com/2022/08/05/europe/scientist-space-image-chorizo-intl-scli-scn/index.html


Jeff Rothstein
 

Just shows you what happens when you don’t click the link! 


ROBERT WYNNE
 

It's appearance on this forum was timely. The chorizo a good example of very interpretive art. -Best, Robert

On 08/07/2022 7:03 AM Jeff B <mnebula946@...> wrote:


So funny really.

On Sat, Aug 6, 2022 at 11:51 PM Richard Crisp <rdcrisp@...> wrote:

Yes, that information was contained within the article linked in the original posting.

 

 

 

From: main@ap-ug.groups.io <main@ap-ug.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jeff Rothstein
Sent: Saturday, August 6, 2022 7:37 PM
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-ug] Jwst image of Proxima Centauri

 

Monsieur Klein has acknowledged that this was a prank. That photo is not Proxima Centauri, it is a piece of Spanish chorizo.  https://www.cnn.com/2022/08/05/europe/scientist-space-image-chorizo-intl-scli-scn/index.html





ROBERT WYNNE
 

Put me on the list. -Best, Robert

On 08/06/2022 6:33 AM M Hambrick <mhambrick563@...> wrote:


A couple months ago someone on Cloudy Nights posted a link to an article claiming to show telescope images of a nearby exoplanet. I don't remember any details (telescope, stellar system, etc), but the "image" of the exoplanet showed it in the partial (about 1/2 full) phase. I thought to myself, "Wow ! That must be a powerful telescope to be able to see an exoplanet in the partial phase."

I challenged that this "image" might have been an artist's rendering instead of a real image. The article and all traces of that post were pulled from the forum in less than an hour.

On a more serious note, has Hubble, JWST, or any earthbound telescope ever been able to actually resolve the disk of a star other than the Sun ? I once calculated what the angular diameter of Arcturus would be if it were the same distance as Proxima Centauri and got something like 0.001 Arc-seconds. 

It is probably a safe bet to say that at least for our hobby, the classical physics definition of all stars as point sources of light is safe for some time to come. Unless maybe Roland decides to make a 1-meter diameter APO scope :>)

Mike


Jeffc
 

I would vote for this to be an APOD.


On Tue, Aug 9, 2022 at 4:43 PM ROBERT WYNNE <robert-wynne@...> wrote:
Put me on the list. -Best, Robert
On 08/06/2022 6:33 AM M Hambrick <mhambrick563@...> wrote:


A couple months ago someone on Cloudy Nights posted a link to an article claiming to show telescope images of a nearby exoplanet. I don't remember any details (telescope, stellar system, etc), but the "image" of the exoplanet showed it in the partial (about 1/2 full) phase. I thought to myself, "Wow ! That must be a powerful telescope to be able to see an exoplanet in the partial phase."

I challenged that this "image" might have been an artist's rendering instead of a real image. The article and all traces of that post were pulled from the forum in less than an hour.

On a more serious note, has Hubble, JWST, or any earthbound telescope ever been able to actually resolve the disk of a star other than the Sun ? I once calculated what the angular diameter of Arcturus would be if it were the same distance as Proxima Centauri and got something like 0.001 Arc-seconds. 

It is probably a safe bet to say that at least for our hobby, the classical physics definition of all stars as point sources of light is safe for some time to come. Unless maybe Roland decides to make a 1-meter diameter APO scope :>)

Mike