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ISS Attempt This Morning


Haydon Burns
 

Well, inspired by Pete's and other's photos I figured I'd give it a shot.  The scope is a 150 mak and was taking the photos at 3600 focal length.  My camera's pixel size is 4.97um.  Not sure where to take it from here.  Based on what is currently in my arsenal, I don't think it would work out to go to 7,200 focal length but that is the smallest jump I can go.  Not really sure where I  go from here to improve, whether it would be better to reduce focal length, etc.  Though, I will likely leave it at this focal length and hope to get better focus the next time.  I was at 1,250 ISO and 1/1600 exposure.  My current camera/card combo does not have enough buffer to shoot raw for very many successive shots, so I stuck with Jpg.  Hesitant to increase exposure with the movement, but may try to a little.  At any rate, fun little adrenaline rush during the few minutes while it passes. 


Pete Lardizabal
 


Nice catch Haydon!

Looks like you are using a Nikon D810. Short bursts capturing RAW files is preferable to long JPEG bursts. Focusing is difficult followed only by tracking. What elevation was this image captured at? 

😎

Pete

On Feb 20, 2021, at 11:28 AM, Haydon Burns <hayburns@...> wrote:

Well, inspired by Pete's and other's photos I figured I'd give it a shot.  The scope is a 150 mak and was taking the photos at 3600 focal length.  My camera's pixel size is 4.97um.  Not sure where to take it from here.  Based on what is currently in my arsenal, I don't think it would work out to go to 7,200 focal length but that is the smallest jump I can go.  Not really sure where I  go from here to improve, whether it would be better to reduce focal length, etc.  Though, I will likely leave it at this focal length and hope to get better focus the next time.  I was at 1,250 ISO and 1/1600 exposure.  My current camera/card combo does not have enough buffer to shoot raw for very many successive shots, so I stuck with Jpg.  Hesitant to increase exposure with the movement, but may try to a little.  At any rate, fun little adrenaline rush during the few minutes while it passes. 
<ISS.jpg>


jimmyjujames
 

I call this a successful ISS capture.
I can see the solar panels.
I also have problems with focus which for my setup changes as ISS approaches and departs.
 
Jimmy
 


Haydon Burns
 

Thanks and that’s right it is a D810.    So, what ISO and exposure would you shoot for at I guess -4 or -5 magnitude?  I’m not sure what direction to go in with respect to focal length either.  I think it was pretty high overhead, pure guess would be maybe 75 or 80 degrees?  I don’t know.    I was fumbling around trying to maneuver as it passed.  Is it best to use the moon as a starting point for focus?  The moon wasn’t out so I just used a star.   I’m sure trying to focus on the fly would get messy for me right now.

Thanks!
Haydon

On Sat, Feb 20, 2021 at 12:06 PM Pete Lardizabal <p14@...> wrote:

Nice catch Haydon!

Looks like you are using a Nikon D810. Short bursts capturing RAW files is preferable to long JPEG bursts. Focusing is difficult followed only by tracking. What elevation was this image captured at? 

😎

Pete

On Feb 20, 2021, at 11:28 AM, Haydon Burns <hayburns@...> wrote:

Well, inspired by Pete's and other's photos I figured I'd give it a shot.  The scope is a 150 mak and was taking the photos at 3600 focal length.  My camera's pixel size is 4.97um.  Not sure where to take it from here.  Based on what is currently in my arsenal, I don't think it would work out to go to 7,200 focal length but that is the smallest jump I can go.  Not really sure where I  go from here to improve, whether it would be better to reduce focal length, etc.  Though, I will likely leave it at this focal length and hope to get better focus the next time.  I was at 1,250 ISO and 1/1600 exposure.  My current camera/card combo does not have enough buffer to shoot raw for very many successive shots, so I stuck with Jpg.  Hesitant to increase exposure with the movement, but may try to a little.  At any rate, fun little adrenaline rush during the few minutes while it passes. 
<ISS.jpg>


Haydon Burns
 

Ah ha, sea level of course!


Stuart
 

Haydon, wow! I think it turned out really well! 

Stuart 

On Sat, Feb 20, 2021 at 11:28 AM Haydon Burns <hayburns@...> wrote:
Well, inspired by Pete's and other's photos I figured I'd give it a shot.  The scope is a 150 mak and was taking the photos at 3600 focal length.  My camera's pixel size is 4.97um.  Not sure where to take it from here.  Based on what is currently in my arsenal, I don't think it would work out to go to 7,200 focal length but that is the smallest jump I can go.  Not really sure where I  go from here to improve, whether it would be better to reduce focal length, etc.  Though, I will likely leave it at this focal length and hope to get better focus the next time.  I was at 1,250 ISO and 1/1600 exposure.  My current camera/card combo does not have enough buffer to shoot raw for very many successive shots, so I stuck with Jpg.  Hesitant to increase exposure with the movement, but may try to a little.  At any rate, fun little adrenaline rush during the few minutes while it passes. 


Haydon Burns
 

Oh thanks I appreciate it.  Never would have imagined being able to take a photo of it before seeing the pictures here.

Thanks,

Haydon


Pete Lardizabal
 

Haydon,

I’ll use an item in the same anticipated max elevation for initial focus. Stars are always a good choice in that they not only provide a point focus subject but additionally provide a measure of image stability for these encounters. Live view can be useful to check initial focus accuracy and if necessary help one adjust the viewfinder diopter setting.

Manually panning and focusing takes practice and patience. Commercial/military aircraft flying above 30,000 feet provide good practice subjects. Remember to breathe! Holding your breath during these will only make for poorly focused images. 

🤓

Pete

On Feb 20, 2021, at 1:08 PM, Haydon Burns <hayburns@...> wrote:


Thanks and that’s right it is a D810.    So, what ISO and exposure would you shoot for at I guess -4 or -5 magnitude?  I’m not sure what direction to go in with respect to focal length either.  I think it was pretty high overhead, pure guess would be maybe 75 or 80 degrees?  I don’t know.    I was fumbling around trying to maneuver as it passed.  Is it best to use the moon as a starting point for focus?  The moon wasn’t out so I just used a star.   I’m sure trying to focus on the fly would get messy for me right now.

Thanks!
Haydon

On Sat, Feb 20, 2021 at 12:06 PM Pete Lardizabal <p14@...> wrote:

Nice catch Haydon!

Looks like you are using a Nikon D810. Short bursts capturing RAW files is preferable to long JPEG bursts. Focusing is difficult followed only by tracking. What elevation was this image captured at? 

😎

Pete

On Feb 20, 2021, at 11:28 AM, Haydon Burns <hayburns@...> wrote:

Well, inspired by Pete's and other's photos I figured I'd give it a shot.  The scope is a 150 mak and was taking the photos at 3600 focal length.  My camera's pixel size is 4.97um.  Not sure where to take it from here.  Based on what is currently in my arsenal, I don't think it would work out to go to 7,200 focal length but that is the smallest jump I can go.  Not really sure where I  go from here to improve, whether it would be better to reduce focal length, etc.  Though, I will likely leave it at this focal length and hope to get better focus the next time.  I was at 1,250 ISO and 1/1600 exposure.  My current camera/card combo does not have enough buffer to shoot raw for very many successive shots, so I stuck with Jpg.  Hesitant to increase exposure with the movement, but may try to a little.  At any rate, fun little adrenaline rush during the few minutes while it passes. 
<ISS.jpg>


Haydon Burns
 

Thank you very much Pete.  And I will try RAW next time in short bursts.  For some reason my camera is showing a buffer of r33 with JPG and r19 with RAW.  Another member emailed me some advise regarding the card.  For some other reason this screenshot shows more detail up close then when zooming in on an original?  I'm not the most knowledgeable when it comes to cameras and it feels I like I have a better comfort level with how the camera and files behave with the moon and more and more with longer exposures for deepsky.  

Thanks again!
Haydon