[ap-gto] [ap-ug] A colorful Southern Sky Beauty


Roland Christen
 

yep, I rem,ember doing that with my Nikon camera and Tri-X film.
Whatever happened to that 7"F15 lens? It was one of the first lenses we ever made.

Rolando


-----Original Message-----
From: Jeff B <mnebula946@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Cc: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Sent: Thu, Apr 29, 2021 7:44 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] [ap-ug] A colorful Southern Sky Beauty

That's great Roland and what a wonderful story.  

Yeah, looking back, the days of film seem down right barbarous today.   For lunar/planetary shots, I did the old "hat trick".  I'd focus the old Olympus OM-1 as best I could with a magnifier, retract the mirror, climb up on the ladder and literally placed a hat over the objective (it was a 7" F15 triplet you made), climb back down, open the shutter, climbed back up, slowly pulled the hot forward so it was not touching the scope, waited a few seconds for vibration to settle, flip the hat away then back over the lens to do the exposure, climbed back down again and closed the shutter.

For the next exposure, I did it all-over-again.   

I do NOT miss those days....except that I had a 2 in front of my age.  That part I do miss.

Jeff

On Thu, Apr 29, 2021 at 7:47 PM Pete Lardizabal <p14@...> wrote:
Great stuff Roland! 👍🏻👍🏻👍🏻

I always marvel at the incredible works posted by this group but it is so fun to see the results of impromptu pix. That’s some kinda nice “telephoto” lens you used. 

😂😂😂

Pete



On Apr 29, 2021, at 7:16 PM, Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:


Hi Astronuts,

I uploaded a second image taken at my Hawaii observatory. While cruising around the southern skies with my 175 refractor, visually, I was struck by the brightness and beauty of this famous object. Now I know that this has been imaged with much more high resolution cameras and scopes, in narrowband and RGB etc, and this image is nowhere near what can be done with even rudimentary equipment. It's just a quick snapshot of a small number of 30 second exposures with my Sony DSLR replacing my 2" eyepiece in the diagonal. No guiding, no processing, just a fun image. It actually looked similar visually in my 2" eyepiece, but without the bright colors that the camera recorded.

I would have been over the Moon if I could have done something like this back 30 years ago with color slide film. Would have taken over an hour, with me glued to a guiding reticle eyepiece, pushing buttons to and fro to keep the guide star on the crosshairs. And then have the film destroyed at the local photo developer (don't laugh, it happened to me a few times).


Rolando


John Nassr
 

Rolando,

I identify wholeheartedly with your sentiments for your fun image of Eta Carina. I too recall the days (much younger) with eye glued for an hour to an illuminated guiding reticle, with pesky mosquitos trying to enter my ear, dealing with forming gas, film reciprocity failure, and having the film ruined by the local photo developer. The only reason I can think of for subjecting oneself to such trials, is that mixed nuts are blended with a bit of masochism, and a good measure of love for astroimaging. Dontcha just love it!

John

On Friday, April 30, 2021, 9:21:25 AM GMT+8, Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...> wrote:


yep, I rem,ember doing that with my Nikon camera and Tri-X film.
Whatever happened to that 7"F15 lens? It was one of the first lenses we ever made.

Rolando


-----Original Message-----
From: Jeff B <mnebula946@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Cc: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Sent: Thu, Apr 29, 2021 7:44 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] [ap-ug] A colorful Southern Sky Beauty

That's great Roland and what a wonderful story.  

Yeah, looking back, the days of film seem down right barbarous today.   For lunar/planetary shots, I did the old "hat trick".  I'd focus the old Olympus OM-1 as best I could with a magnifier, retract the mirror, climb up on the ladder and literally placed a hat over the objective (it was a 7" F15 triplet you made), climb back down, open the shutter, climbed back up, slowly pulled the hot forward so it was not touching the scope, waited a few seconds for vibration to settle, flip the hat away then back over the lens to do the exposure, climbed back down again and closed the shutter.

For the next exposure, I did it all-over-again.   

I do NOT miss those days....except that I had a 2 in front of my age.  That part I do miss.

Jeff

On Thu, Apr 29, 2021 at 7:47 PM Pete Lardizabal <p14@...> wrote:
Great stuff Roland! 👍🏻👍🏻👍🏻

I always marvel at the incredible works posted by this group but it is so fun to see the results of impromptu pix. That’s some kinda nice “telephoto” lens you used. 

😂😂😂

Pete



On Apr 29, 2021, at 7:16 PM, Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:


Hi Astronuts,

I uploaded a second image taken at my Hawaii observatory. While cruising around the southern skies with my 175 refractor, visually, I was struck by the brightness and beauty of this famous object. Now I know that this has been imaged with much more high resolution cameras and scopes, in narrowband and RGB etc, and this image is nowhere near what can be done with even rudimentary equipment. It's just a quick snapshot of a small number of 30 second exposures with my Sony DSLR replacing my 2" eyepiece in the diagonal. No guiding, no processing, just a fun image. It actually looked similar visually in my 2" eyepiece, but without the bright colors that the camera recorded.

I would have been over the Moon if I could have done something like this back 30 years ago with color slide film. Would have taken over an hour, with me glued to a guiding reticle eyepiece, pushing buttons to and fro to keep the guide star on the crosshairs. And then have the film destroyed at the local photo developer (don't laugh, it happened to me a few times).


Rolando


Richard Crisp
 

I really like that image and that is such an awesome object

 

I always thought the southern sky was the better sky for imaging cool nebulae using narrowband filters.

 

But we have our beauties too.

 

I guess it is like the cows I see out here in the sierra: poking their necks through the barbed wire fences to get that greener grass just on the other side of the fence (equator)!

 

 

 

From: main@ap-ug.groups.io <main@ap-ug.groups.io> On Behalf Of John Nassr via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, April 29, 2021 6:47 PM
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] [ap-ug] A colorful Southern Sky Beauty

 

Rolando,

 

I identify wholeheartedly with your sentiments for your fun image of Eta Carina. I too recall the days (much younger) with eye glued for an hour to an illuminated guiding reticle, with pesky mosquitos trying to enter my ear, dealing with forming gas, film reciprocity failure, and having the film ruined by the local photo developer. The only reason I can think of for subjecting oneself to such trials, is that mixed nuts are blended with a bit of masochism, and a good measure of love for astroimaging. Dontcha just love it!

 

John

 

On Friday, April 30, 2021, 9:21:25 AM GMT+8, Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...> wrote:

 

 

yep, I rem,ember doing that with my Nikon camera and Tri-X film.

Whatever happened to that 7"F15 lens? It was one of the first lenses we ever made.

 

Rolando

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Jeff B <mnebula946@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Cc: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Sent: Thu, Apr 29, 2021 7:44 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] [ap-ug] A colorful Southern Sky Beauty

That's great Roland and what a wonderful story.  

 

Yeah, looking back, the days of film seem down right barbarous today.   For lunar/planetary shots, I did the old "hat trick".  I'd focus the old Olympus OM-1 as best I could with a magnifier, retract the mirror, climb up on the ladder and literally placed a hat over the objective (it was a 7" F15 triplet you made), climb back down, open the shutter, climbed back up, slowly pulled the hot forward so it was not touching the scope, waited a few seconds for vibration to settle, flip the hat away then back over the lens to do the exposure, climbed back down again and closed the shutter.

 

For the next exposure, I did it all-over-again.   

 

I do NOT miss those days....except that I had a 2 in front of my age.  That part I do miss.

 

Jeff

 

On Thu, Apr 29, 2021 at 7:47 PM Pete Lardizabal <p14@...> wrote:

Great stuff Roland! 👍🏻👍🏻👍🏻

 

I always marvel at the incredible works posted by this group but it is so fun to see the results of impromptu pix. That’s some kinda nice “telephoto” lens you used. 

 

😂😂😂

 

Pete

 

 



On Apr 29, 2021, at 7:16 PM, Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:



Hi Astronuts,

 

I uploaded a second image taken at my Hawaii observatory. While cruising around the southern skies with my 175 refractor, visually, I was struck by the brightness and beauty of this famous object. Now I know that this has been imaged with much more high resolution cameras and scopes, in narrowband and RGB etc, and this image is nowhere near what can be done with even rudimentary equipment. It's just a quick snapshot of a small number of 30 second exposures with my Sony DSLR replacing my 2" eyepiece in the diagonal. No guiding, no processing, just a fun image. It actually looked similar visually in my 2" eyepiece, but without the bright colors that the camera recorded.

 

I would have been over the Moon if I could have done something like this back 30 years ago with color slide film. Would have taken over an hour, with me glued to a guiding reticle eyepiece, pushing buttons to and fro to keep the guide star on the crosshairs. And then have the film destroyed at the local photo developer (don't laugh, it happened to me a few times).

 

 

Rolando


Roland Christen
 


I guess it is like the cows I see out here in the sierra: poking their necks through the barbed wire fences to get that greener grass just on the other side of the fence (equator)!
Yes, and the guys down there are always trying to see how much of the Andromeda nebula they can capture ;^))

Rolando


-----Original Message-----
From: Richard Crisp <rdcrisp@...>
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Sent: Thu, Apr 29, 2021 8:53 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] [ap-ug] A colorful Southern Sky Beauty

I really like that image and that is such an awesome object
 
I always thought the southern sky was the better sky for imaging cool nebulae using narrowband filters.
 
But we have our beauties too.
 
I guess it is like the cows I see out here in the sierra: poking their necks through the barbed wire fences to get that greener grass just on the other side of the fence (equator)!
 
 
 
From: main@ap-ug.groups.io <main@ap-ug.groups.io> On Behalf Of John Nassr via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, April 29, 2021 6:47 PM
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] [ap-ug] A colorful Southern Sky Beauty
 
Rolando,
 
I identify wholeheartedly with your sentiments for your fun image of Eta Carina. I too recall the days (much younger) with eye glued for an hour to an illuminated guiding reticle, with pesky mosquitos trying to enter my ear, dealing with forming gas, film reciprocity failure, and having the film ruined by the local photo developer. The only reason I can think of for subjecting oneself to such trials, is that mixed nuts are blended with a bit of masochism, and a good measure of love for astroimaging. Dontcha just love it!
 
John
 
On Friday, April 30, 2021, 9:21:25 AM GMT+8, Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...> wrote:
 
 
yep, I rem,ember doing that with my Nikon camera and Tri-X film.
Whatever happened to that 7"F15 lens? It was one of the first lenses we ever made.
 
Rolando
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Jeff B <mnebula946@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Cc: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Sent: Thu, Apr 29, 2021 7:44 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] [ap-ug] A colorful Southern Sky Beauty
That's great Roland and what a wonderful story.  
 
Yeah, looking back, the days of film seem down right barbarous today.   For lunar/planetary shots, I did the old "hat trick".  I'd focus the old Olympus OM-1 as best I could with a magnifier, retract the mirror, climb up on the ladder and literally placed a hat over the objective (it was a 7" F15 triplet you made), climb back down, open the shutter, climbed back up, slowly pulled the hot forward so it was not touching the scope, waited a few seconds for vibration to settle, flip the hat away then back over the lens to do the exposure, climbed back down again and closed the shutter.
 
For the next exposure, I did it all-over-again.   
 
I do NOT miss those days....except that I had a 2 in front of my age.  That part I do miss.
 
Jeff
 
On Thu, Apr 29, 2021 at 7:47 PM Pete Lardizabal <p14@...> wrote:
Great stuff Roland! 👍🏻👍🏻👍🏻
 
I always marvel at the incredible works posted by this group but it is so fun to see the results of impromptu pix. That’s some kinda nice “telephoto” lens you used. 
 
😂😂😂
 
Pete
 
 


On Apr 29, 2021, at 7:16 PM, Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

Hi Astronuts,
 
I uploaded a second image taken at my Hawaii observatory. While cruising around the southern skies with my 175 refractor, visually, I was struck by the brightness and beauty of this famous object. Now I know that this has been imaged with much more high resolution cameras and scopes, in narrowband and RGB etc, and this image is nowhere near what can be done with even rudimentary equipment. It's just a quick snapshot of a small number of 30 second exposures with my Sony DSLR replacing my 2" eyepiece in the diagonal. No guiding, no processing, just a fun image. It actually looked similar visually in my 2" eyepiece, but without the bright colors that the camera recorded.
 
I would have been over the Moon if I could have done something like this back 30 years ago with color slide film. Would have taken over an hour, with me glued to a guiding reticle eyepiece, pushing buttons to and fro to keep the guide star on the crosshairs. And then have the film destroyed at the local photo developer (don't laugh, it happened to me a few times).
 
 
Rolando


Richard Crisp
 

Or maybe M101 or M81/82 😊

 

 

 

From: main@ap-ug.groups.io <main@ap-ug.groups.io> On Behalf Of Roland Christen via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, April 29, 2021 7:01 PM
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] [ap-ug] A colorful Southern Sky Beauty

 

 

I guess it is like the cows I see out here in the sierra: poking their necks through the barbed wire fences to get that greener grass just on the other side of the fence (equator)!

Yes, and the guys down there are always trying to see how much of the Andromeda nebula they can capture ;^))

 

Rolando

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Richard Crisp <rdcrisp@...>
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Sent: Thu, Apr 29, 2021 8:53 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] [ap-ug] A colorful Southern Sky Beauty

I really like that image and that is such an awesome object

 

I always thought the southern sky was the better sky for imaging cool nebulae using narrowband filters.

 

But we have our beauties too.

 

I guess it is like the cows I see out here in the sierra: poking their necks through the barbed wire fences to get that greener grass just on the other side of the fence (equator)!

 

 

 

From: main@ap-ug.groups.io <main@ap-ug.groups.io> On Behalf Of John Nassr via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, April 29, 2021 6:47 PM
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] [ap-ug] A colorful Southern Sky Beauty

 

Rolando,

 

I identify wholeheartedly with your sentiments for your fun image of Eta Carina. I too recall the days (much younger) with eye glued for an hour to an illuminated guiding reticle, with pesky mosquitos trying to enter my ear, dealing with forming gas, film reciprocity failure, and having the film ruined by the local photo developer. The only reason I can think of for subjecting oneself to such trials, is that mixed nuts are blended with a bit of masochism, and a good measure of love for astroimaging. Dontcha just love it!

 

John

 

On Friday, April 30, 2021, 9:21:25 AM GMT+8, Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...> wrote:

 

 

yep, I rem,ember doing that with my Nikon camera and Tri-X film.

Whatever happened to that 7"F15 lens? It was one of the first lenses we ever made.

 

Rolando

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Jeff B <mnebula946@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Cc: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Sent: Thu, Apr 29, 2021 7:44 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] [ap-ug] A colorful Southern Sky Beauty

That's great Roland and what a wonderful story.  

 

Yeah, looking back, the days of film seem down right barbarous today.   For lunar/planetary shots, I did the old "hat trick".  I'd focus the old Olympus OM-1 as best I could with a magnifier, retract the mirror, climb up on the ladder and literally placed a hat over the objective (it was a 7" F15 triplet you made), climb back down, open the shutter, climbed back up, slowly pulled the hot forward so it was not touching the scope, waited a few seconds for vibration to settle, flip the hat away then back over the lens to do the exposure, climbed back down again and closed the shutter.

 

For the next exposure, I did it all-over-again.   

 

I do NOT miss those days....except that I had a 2 in front of my age.  That part I do miss.

 

Jeff

 

On Thu, Apr 29, 2021 at 7:47 PM Pete Lardizabal <p14@...> wrote:

Great stuff Roland! 👍🏻👍🏻👍🏻

 

I always marvel at the incredible works posted by this group but it is so fun to see the results of impromptu pix. That’s some kinda nice “telephoto” lens you used. 

 

😂😂😂

 

Pete

 

 

 

On Apr 29, 2021, at 7:16 PM, Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:



Hi Astronuts,

 

I uploaded a second image taken at my Hawaii observatory. While cruising around the southern skies with my 175 refractor, visually, I was struck by the brightness and beauty of this famous object. Now I know that this has been imaged with much more high resolution cameras and scopes, in narrowband and RGB etc, and this image is nowhere near what can be done with even rudimentary equipment. It's just a quick snapshot of a small number of 30 second exposures with my Sony DSLR replacing my 2" eyepiece in the diagonal. No guiding, no processing, just a fun image. It actually looked similar visually in my 2" eyepiece, but without the bright colors that the camera recorded.

 

I would have been over the Moon if I could have done something like this back 30 years ago with color slide film. Would have taken over an hour, with me glued to a guiding reticle eyepiece, pushing buttons to and fro to keep the guide star on the crosshairs. And then have the film destroyed at the local photo developer (don't laugh, it happened to me a few times).

 

 

Rolando


Roland Christen
 

Last I heard the person who bought that lens managed to drop it and chip the glass. I don't recall the name anymore.

Roland

-----Original Message-----
From: Jeff Blazey <mnebula946@...>
To: chris1011@...
Cc: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io>; main@ap-ug.groups.io <main@ap-ug.groups.io>
Sent: Fri, Apr 30, 2021 8:29 am
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] [ap-ug] A colorful Southern Sky Beauty

Hey Roland.

Yes, you called it your "Mars Lens".  I made a straight through bino-friendly (the old Celestron viewer) OTA around it with a Parks fiberglass tube (in retrospect, the fiberglass was not a good idea) and mounted it on a modified Cave Observatory beast inside a 14 x 14 foot observatory with a roll off roof.  It served me well and after I moved here to Ohio, a few years later I pretty much exited the hobby for ~ 10 years, selling the 7" in the process in the early 90's.  I've been trying to track it down with no success.    It was very good!  Attached is one surviving photo of Venus, single shot, K64, "hat trick".  Visually, the image was just incredible, very white with much detail in the cloud structure around the terminator.  

My other big regret was selling off my pre-traveler 4" F6 triplets (I had two).  It was an astonishing telephoto lens, especially with the reducer flattener (which BTW, I still have) at F4.  Super bright, with exceptional contrast and very manageable.  My Olympus's light meter would read it as an F2.8 lens.

Jeff

On Thu, Apr 29, 2021 at 9:21 PM <chris1011@...> wrote:
yep, I rem,ember doing that with my Nikon camera and Tri-X film.
Whatever happened to that 7"F15 lens? It was one of the first lenses we ever made.

Rolando


-----Original Message-----
From: Jeff B <mnebula946@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Cc: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Sent: Thu, Apr 29, 2021 7:44 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] [ap-ug] A colorful Southern Sky Beauty

That's great Roland and what a wonderful story.  

Yeah, looking back, the days of film seem down right barbarous today.   For lunar/planetary shots, I did the old "hat trick".  I'd focus the old Olympus OM-1 as best I could with a magnifier, retract the mirror, climb up on the ladder and literally placed a hat over the objective (it was a 7" F15 triplet you made), climb back down, open the shutter, climbed back up, slowly pulled the hot forward so it was not touching the scope, waited a few seconds for vibration to settle, flip the hat away then back over the lens to do the exposure, climbed back down again and closed the shutter.

For the next exposure, I did it all-over-again.   

I do NOT miss those days....except that I had a 2 in front of my age.  That part I do miss.

Jeff

On Thu, Apr 29, 2021 at 7:47 PM Pete Lardizabal <p14@...> wrote:
Great stuff Roland! 👍🏻👍🏻👍🏻

I always marvel at the incredible works posted by this group but it is so fun to see the results of impromptu pix. That’s some kinda nice “telephoto” lens you used. 

😂😂😂

Pete



On Apr 29, 2021, at 7:16 PM, Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:


Hi Astronuts,

I uploaded a second image taken at my Hawaii observatory. While cruising around the southern skies with my 175 refractor, visually, I was struck by the brightness and beauty of this famous object. Now I know that this has been imaged with much more high resolution cameras and scopes, in narrowband and RGB etc, and this image is nowhere near what can be done with even rudimentary equipment. It's just a quick snapshot of a small number of 30 second exposures with my Sony DSLR replacing my 2" eyepiece in the diagonal. No guiding, no processing, just a fun image. It actually looked similar visually in my 2" eyepiece, but without the bright colors that the camera recorded.

I would have been over the Moon if I could have done something like this back 30 years ago with color slide film. Would have taken over an hour, with me glued to a guiding reticle eyepiece, pushing buttons to and fro to keep the guide star on the crosshairs. And then have the film destroyed at the local photo developer (don't laugh, it happened to me a few times).


Rolando


Ross Elkins
 

Wow, another gorgeous picture, Rolando!

Ross


Ross Elkins
 

I had to console many a sad photographer! I managed a photo shop, “Milbee Photo Stores” part of a chain of 20 or so small shops where the nicest camera was made by Kodak and film processing was the profit center.
I was doing wedding/bar mitzvah photography and many of my pals were the top fashion photographers of the day.
I bought n sold 35mm cameras that came in the front door! Nikons F’s, the Olympus OM1, the Fugi 120 with the 120 negative. Our pal Hideoki Hagiwara was Japans most famous photographer at the time. On a trip to Tokyo, he brought back an Olympus Pen F ½ frame for each one of us! Him and My pal Paul Hyman had a large studio at 100 Fifth Ave, what an address! Almost across the street from Max’s Kansas City where all the photo/music/artists elite hung. Paul has a photo project from the atlas mountain tribes that is part of the MET’s permanent collection!
I still have my Pen F with a couple of lenses! I gave that life up for almost famous music and a California life in 1974!

Ross


Roland Christen
 

I have a collection of Nikon and Pentax film cameras that sit unused on my "museum" shelves. It's a pity really. Couple of years back i bought some rolls of 120 color film and shot some pictures of our prairie. Even with the medium format film I could see the graininess that limited the resolution. It's like a factor of 10 in resolution gain of CCD/digital over film.

Rolando

-----Original Message-----
From: Ross Elkins <rossmon1@...>
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Sent: Fri, Apr 30, 2021 11:57 am
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] [ap-ug] A colorful Southern Sky Beauty

I had to console many a sad photographer! I managed a photo shop, “Milbee Photo Stores” part of a chain of 20 or so small shops where the nicest camera was made by Kodak and film processing was the profit center.
I was doing wedding/bar mitzvah photography and many of my pals were the top fashion photographers of the day.
I bought n sold 35mm cameras that came in the front door! Nikons F’s, the Olympus OM1, the Fugi 120 with the 120 negative. Our pal Hideoki Hagiwara was Japans most famous photographer at the time. On a trip to Tokyo, he brought back an Olympus Pen F ½ frame for each one of us! Him and My pal Paul Hyman had a large studio at 100 Fifth Ave, what an address! Almost across the street from Max’s Kansas City where all the photo/music/artists elite hung. Paul has a photo project from the atlas mountain tribes that is part of the MET’s permanent collection!
I still have my Pen F with a couple of lenses! I gave that life up for almost famous music and a California life in 1974!

Ross






ROBERT WYNNE
 

It's really a shame that all these high end lenses are relegated to museum shelves. Someone ought to figure out some sort of adapter. I must have over 20k in lenses I can't seem to let go of. I was a Canon F1 fan. -Best, Robert

On 04/30/2021 10:13 AM Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...> wrote:
 
 
I have a collection of Nikon and Pentax film cameras that sit unused on my "museum" shelves. It's a pity really. Couple of years back i bought some rolls of 120 color film and shot some pictures of our prairie. Even with the medium format film I could see the graininess that limited the resolution. It's like a factor of 10 in resolution gain of CCD/digital over film.
 
Rolando
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Ross Elkins <rossmon1@...>
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Sent: Fri, Apr 30, 2021 11:57 am
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] [ap-ug] A colorful Southern Sky Beauty

I had to console many a sad photographer! I managed a photo shop, “Milbee Photo Stores” part of a chain of 20 or so small shops where the nicest camera was made by Kodak and film processing was the profit center.
I was doing wedding/bar mitzvah photography and many of my pals were the top fashion photographers of the day.
I bought n sold 35mm cameras that came in the front door! Nikons F’s, the Olympus OM1, the Fugi 120 with the 120 negative. Our pal Hideoki Hagiwara was Japans most famous photographer at the time. On a trip to Tokyo, he brought back an Olympus Pen F ½ frame for each one of us! Him and My pal Paul Hyman had a large studio at 100 Fifth Ave, what an address! Almost across the street from Max’s Kansas City where all the photo/music/artists elite hung. Paul has a photo project from the atlas mountain tribes that is part of the MET’s permanent collection!
I still have my Pen F with a couple of lenses! I gave that life up for almost famous music and a California life in 1974!
 
Ross
 
 
 
 
 


Alan Friedman
 

The modern mirrorless cameras are just the ticket for revisiting vintage lenses. With the proper adapter you can mount just about anything. I’ve been testing and using some of my favorite old Leica, Zeiss and Nikkor lenses on a Leica SL body and also on the recent Sigma fp which is a very lightweight modular system. Not using any of this for astronomy, but it’s nice to get back outside and look at the world again through a new (old) lens.

Alan




On Apr 30, 2021, at 1:36 PM, ROBERT WYNNE <robert-wynne@...> wrote:

It's really a shame that all these high end lenses are relegated to museum shelves. Someone ought to figure out some sort of adapter. I must have over 20k in lenses I can't seem to let go of. I was a Canon F1 fan. -Best, Robert
On 04/30/2021 10:13 AM Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...> wrote:
 
 
I have a collection of Nikon and Pentax film cameras that sit unused on my "museum" shelves. It's a pity really. Couple of years back i bought some rolls of 120 color film and shot some pictures of our prairie. Even with the medium format film I could see the graininess that limited the resolution. It's like a factor of 10 in resolution gain of CCD/digital over film. 
 
Rolando
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Ross Elkins <rossmon1@...>
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Sent: Fri, Apr 30, 2021 11:57 am
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] [ap-ug] A colorful Southern Sky Beauty

I had to console many a sad photographer! I managed a photo shop, “Milbee Photo Stores” part of a chain of 20 or so small shops where the nicest camera was made by Kodak and film processing was the profit center.
I was doing wedding/bar mitzvah photography and many of my pals were the top fashion photographers of the day.
I bought n sold 35mm cameras that came in the front door! Nikons F’s, the Olympus OM1, the Fugi 120 with the 120 negative. Our pal Hideoki Hagiwara was Japans most famous photographer at the time. On a trip to Tokyo, he brought back an Olympus Pen F ½ frame for each one of us! Him and My pal Paul Hyman had a large studio at 100 Fifth Ave, what an address! Almost across the street from Max’s Kansas City where all the photo/music/artists elite hung. Paul has a photo project from the atlas mountain tribes that is part of the MET’s permanent collection!
I still have my Pen F with a couple of lenses! I gave that life up for almost famous music and a California life in 1974!
 
Ross
 
 
 
 
 


Roland Christen
 

I did get an adapter for my 90mm focal length lens from the Pentax 6x7 medium format film camera. It's a very fast lens wide open F2.8, so I thought it would make an ideal wide field imaging system with either my Sony NEX7 digital camera or my astronomical CCD camera. Well, my first shot wide open produced 100 micron bloated stars in the center with quite severe chromatic aberration. Stopping it down to F8 helped some, but didn't really clean up until F11. At that point it had an aperture of only 8mm, not much more than a dark adapted human eyeball. So, pretty much none of the older film camera lenses, no matter how good they were back then, will hold a candle to a modern lens designed for a digital camera. Even a cheap and cheerful Rokinon will blow these old dinosaurs away.

Rolando

-----Original Message-----
From: ROBERT WYNNE <robert-wynne@...>
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io; Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...>
Sent: Fri, Apr 30, 2021 12:36 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] [ap-ug] A colorful Southern Sky Beauty

It's really a shame that all these high end lenses are relegated to museum shelves. Someone ought to figure out some sort of adapter. I must have over 20k in lenses I can't seem to let go of. I was a Canon F1 fan. -Best, Robert
On 04/30/2021 10:13 AM Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...> wrote:
 
 
I have a collection of Nikon and Pentax film cameras that sit unused on my "museum" shelves. It's a pity really. Couple of years back i bought some rolls of 120 color film and shot some pictures of our prairie. Even with the medium format film I could see the graininess that limited the resolution. It's like a factor of 10 in resolution gain of CCD/digital over film.
 
Rolando
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Ross Elkins <rossmon1@...>
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Sent: Fri, Apr 30, 2021 11:57 am
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] [ap-ug] A colorful Southern Sky Beauty

I had to console many a sad photographer! I managed a photo shop, “Milbee Photo Stores” part of a chain of 20 or so small shops where the nicest camera was made by Kodak and film processing was the profit center.
I was doing wedding/bar mitzvah photography and many of my pals were the top fashion photographers of the day.
I bought n sold 35mm cameras that came in the front door! Nikons F’s, the Olympus OM1, the Fugi 120 with the 120 negative. Our pal Hideoki Hagiwara was Japans most famous photographer at the time. On a trip to Tokyo, he brought back an Olympus Pen F ½ frame for each one of us! Him and My pal Paul Hyman had a large studio at 100 Fifth Ave, what an address! Almost across the street from Max’s Kansas City where all the photo/music/artists elite hung. Paul has a photo project from the atlas mountain tribes that is part of the MET’s permanent collection!
I still have my Pen F with a couple of lenses! I gave that life up for almost famous music and a California life in 1974!
 
Ross
 
 
 
 
 


ROBERT WYNNE
 

Thanks for your reply. I suppose all these lenses are headed to the junk pile - even the fluorite aspheres. What a waste. Though I thought the focal point for all these lenses is the focal plane on the cameras body. If so how can these lenses designed to bring tack sharp images to the cameras focal plane not be adaptable to a ccd's focal plane at the same or an adapted focal plane? Something doesn't seem to add up here. Either that or lens design was sloppy back in the day. -Best, Robert

On 04/30/2021 12:44 PM Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...> wrote:
 
 
I did get an adapter for my 90mm focal length lens from the Pentax 6x7 medium format film camera. It's a very fast lens wide open F2.8, so I thought it would make an ideal wide field imaging system with either my Sony NEX7 digital camera or my astronomical CCD camera. Well, my first shot wide open produced 100 micron bloated stars in the center with quite severe chromatic aberration. Stopping it down to F8 helped some, but didn't really clean up until F11. At that point it had an aperture of only 8mm, not much more than a dark adapted human eyeball. So, pretty much none of the older film camera lenses, no matter how good they were back then, will hold a candle to a modern lens designed for a digital camera. Even a cheap and cheerful Rokinon will blow these old dinosaurs away.
 
Rolando
 
-----Original Message-----
From: ROBERT WYNNE <robert-wynne@...>
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io; Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...>
Sent: Fri, Apr 30, 2021 12:36 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] [ap-ug] A colorful Southern Sky Beauty

It's really a shame that all these high end lenses are relegated to museum shelves. Someone ought to figure out some sort of adapter. I must have over 20k in lenses I can't seem to let go of. I was a Canon F1 fan. -Best, Robert
On 04/30/2021 10:13 AM Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...> wrote:
 
 
I have a collection of Nikon and Pentax film cameras that sit unused on my "museum" shelves. It's a pity really. Couple of years back i bought some rolls of 120 color film and shot some pictures of our prairie. Even with the medium format film I could see the graininess that limited the resolution. It's like a factor of 10 in resolution gain of CCD/digital over film.
 
Rolando
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Ross Elkins <rossmon1@...>
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Sent: Fri, Apr 30, 2021 11:57 am
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] [ap-ug] A colorful Southern Sky Beauty

I had to console many a sad photographer! I managed a photo shop, “Milbee Photo Stores” part of a chain of 20 or so small shops where the nicest camera was made by Kodak and film processing was the profit center.
I was doing wedding/bar mitzvah photography and many of my pals were the top fashion photographers of the day.
I bought n sold 35mm cameras that came in the front door! Nikons F’s, the Olympus OM1, the Fugi 120 with the 120 negative. Our pal Hideoki Hagiwara was Japans most famous photographer at the time. On a trip to Tokyo, he brought back an Olympus Pen F ½ frame for each one of us! Him and My pal Paul Hyman had a large studio at 100 Fifth Ave, what an address! Almost across the street from Max’s Kansas City where all the photo/music/artists elite hung. Paul has a photo project from the atlas mountain tribes that is part of the MET’s permanent collection!
I still have my Pen F with a couple of lenses! I gave that life up for almost famous music and a California life in 1974!
 
Ross
 
 
 
 
 
 


Richard Crisp
 

You can have fun with them nonetheless

 

Focusing can be tricky and tilt can be a problem as well

 

I did this about 15 years ago using those pentax lenses I just posted about

 

http://www.narrowbandimaging.com/widefield_page.htm

 

I was building adaptors and mounting arrangements and having a lot of fun with the machine shop and doing fun stuff

 

I settled on a TIG welded frame that worked pretty well and adaptors I made out of Pentax extension tubes

 

 

 

From: main@ap-ug.groups.io <main@ap-ug.groups.io> On Behalf Of ROBERT WYNNE
Sent: Friday, April 30, 2021 1:12 PM
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io; Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...>
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] [ap-ug] A colorful Southern Sky Beauty

 

Thanks for your reply. I suppose all these lenses are headed to the junk pile - even the fluorite aspheres. What a waste. Though I thought the focal point for all these lenses is the focal plane on the cameras body. If so how can these lenses designed to bring tack sharp images to the cameras focal plane not be adaptable to a ccd's focal plane at the same or an adapted focal plane? Something doesn't seem to add up here. Either that or lens design was sloppy back in the day. -Best, Robert

On 04/30/2021 12:44 PM Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...> wrote:

 

 

I did get an adapter for my 90mm focal length lens from the Pentax 6x7 medium format film camera. It's a very fast lens wide open F2.8, so I thought it would make an ideal wide field imaging system with either my Sony NEX7 digital camera or my astronomical CCD camera. Well, my first shot wide open produced 100 micron bloated stars in the center with quite severe chromatic aberration. Stopping it down to F8 helped some, but didn't really clean up until F11. At that point it had an aperture of only 8mm, not much more than a dark adapted human eyeball. So, pretty much none of the older film camera lenses, no matter how good they were back then, will hold a candle to a modern lens designed for a digital camera. Even a cheap and cheerful Rokinon will blow these old dinosaurs away.

 

Rolando

 

-----Original Message-----
From: ROBERT WYNNE <robert-wynne@...>
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io; Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...>
Sent: Fri, Apr 30, 2021 12:36 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] [ap-ug] A colorful Southern Sky Beauty

It's really a shame that all these high end lenses are relegated to museum shelves. Someone ought to figure out some sort of adapter. I must have over 20k in lenses I can't seem to let go of. I was a Canon F1 fan. -Best, Robert

On 04/30/2021 10:13 AM Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...> wrote:

 

 

I have a collection of Nikon and Pentax film cameras that sit unused on my "museum" shelves. It's a pity really. Couple of years back i bought some rolls of 120 color film and shot some pictures of our prairie. Even with the medium format film I could see the graininess that limited the resolution. It's like a factor of 10 in resolution gain of CCD/digital over film.

 

Rolando

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Ross Elkins <rossmon1@...>
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Sent: Fri, Apr 30, 2021 11:57 am
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] [ap-ug] A colorful Southern Sky Beauty

I had to console many a sad photographer! I managed a photo shop, “Milbee Photo Stores” part of a chain of 20 or so small shops where the nicest camera was made by Kodak and film processing was the profit center.

I was doing wedding/bar mitzvah photography and many of my pals were the top fashion photographers of the day.

I bought n sold 35mm cameras that came in the front door! Nikons F’s, the Olympus OM1, the Fugi 120 with the 120 negative. Our pal Hideoki Hagiwara was Japans most famous photographer at the time. On a trip to Tokyo, he brought back an Olympus Pen F ½ frame for each one of us! Him and My pal Paul Hyman had a large studio at 100 Fifth Ave, what an address! Almost across the street from Max’s Kansas City where all the photo/music/artists elite hung. Paul has a photo project from the atlas mountain tribes that is part of the MET’s permanent collection!

I still have my Pen F with a couple of lenses! I gave that life up for almost famous music and a California life in 1974!

 

Ross

 

 

 

 

 

 


Roland Christen
 

They focus at the right point, they just are not sharp like modern digital designs made for 3 micron pixel size. There old lenses only had to be sharp enough for 50 micron film grain size. Most of them are achromats, and did not use ED or fluorite glass. Thus the heavy chromatic aberrations.

Rolando


-----Original Message-----
From: ROBERT WYNNE <robert-wynne@...>
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io; Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...>
Sent: Fri, Apr 30, 2021 3:11 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] [ap-ug] A colorful Southern Sky Beauty

Thanks for your reply. I suppose all these lenses are headed to the junk pile - even the fluorite aspheres. What a waste. Though I thought the focal point for all these lenses is the focal plane on the cameras body. If so how can these lenses designed to bring tack sharp images to the cameras focal plane not be adaptable to a ccd's focal plane at the same or an adapted focal plane? Something doesn't seem to add up here. Either that or lens design was sloppy back in the day. -Best, Robert
On 04/30/2021 12:44 PM Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...> wrote:
 
 
I did get an adapter for my 90mm focal length lens from the Pentax 6x7 medium format film camera. It's a very fast lens wide open F2.8, so I thought it would make an ideal wide field imaging system with either my Sony NEX7 digital camera or my astronomical CCD camera. Well, my first shot wide open produced 100 micron bloated stars in the center with quite severe chromatic aberration. Stopping it down to F8 helped some, but didn't really clean up until F11. At that point it had an aperture of only 8mm, not much more than a dark adapted human eyeball. So, pretty much none of the older film camera lenses, no matter how good they were back then, will hold a candle to a modern lens designed for a digital camera. Even a cheap and cheerful Rokinon will blow these old dinosaurs away.
 
Rolando
 
-----Original Message-----
From: ROBERT WYNNE <robert-wynne@...>
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io; Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...>
Sent: Fri, Apr 30, 2021 12:36 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] [ap-ug] A colorful Southern Sky Beauty

It's really a shame that all these high end lenses are relegated to museum shelves. Someone ought to figure out some sort of adapter. I must have over 20k in lenses I can't seem to let go of. I was a Canon F1 fan. -Best, Robert
On 04/30/2021 10:13 AM Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...> wrote:
 
 
I have a collection of Nikon and Pentax film cameras that sit unused on my "museum" shelves. It's a pity really. Couple of years back i bought some rolls of 120 color film and shot some pictures of our prairie. Even with the medium format film I could see the graininess that limited the resolution. It's like a factor of 10 in resolution gain of CCD/digital over film.
 
Rolando
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Ross Elkins <rossmon1@...>
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Sent: Fri, Apr 30, 2021 11:57 am
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] [ap-ug] A colorful Southern Sky Beauty

I had to console many a sad photographer! I managed a photo shop, “Milbee Photo Stores” part of a chain of 20 or so small shops where the nicest camera was made by Kodak and film processing was the profit center.
I was doing wedding/bar mitzvah photography and many of my pals were the top fashion photographers of the day.
I bought n sold 35mm cameras that came in the front door! Nikons F’s, the Olympus OM1, the Fugi 120 with the 120 negative. Our pal Hideoki Hagiwara was Japans most famous photographer at the time. On a trip to Tokyo, he brought back an Olympus Pen F ½ frame for each one of us! Him and My pal Paul Hyman had a large studio at 100 Fifth Ave, what an address! Almost across the street from Max’s Kansas City where all the photo/music/artists elite hung. Paul has a photo project from the atlas mountain tribes that is part of the MET’s permanent collection!
I still have my Pen F with a couple of lenses! I gave that life up for almost famous music and a California life in 1974!
 
Ross
 
 
 
 
 
 


ayiomamitis
 

Gents,

I also have some Pentax 6x7 format lenses and I absolutely love them for daytime work and which happen to produce really sharp images when using both an APS as well as a full-frame sensor. If there is an interest, I would be happy to post some test results.

To be totally honest, I bought them for widefield astrophotography work at night but the extended quarantine the past 15 months has hindered my time under the night sky. I will make a note to myself to post links later this summer when I have something to show. We all agree that pinpoints of star light are the best test for any set of optics and which will make or break my satisfaction with the daytime results.

As an afterthought, here is something involving the setting Sun against the National Observatory of Athens which was shot with the Pentax 2x barlow lens as well and which means an effective aperture of f8 when used with the 200/f4 lens: http://www.perseus.gr/Astro-Solar-Scenes-Equinox-20180315.htm .

My Pentax 6x7 arsenal is comprised of the 75/f4.5, 105/f2.4 and 200/f4 lenses as well as the aforementioned Pentax 6x7 2x converter. I have been looking casually for the 150/165 lens as well as the 55mm offering which are supposedly to be very sharp as well (at least for daytime photos).

I would like to think that these lenses would generally be quite effective given the fact they had to satisfy a large piece of real estate (6" x 7") at the back of the camera.

Anthony.

On 01-May-21 00:43, Roland Christen via groups.io wrote:
They focus at the right point, they just are not sharp like modern digital designs made for 3 micron pixel size. There old lenses only had to be sharp enough for 50 micron film grain size. Most of them are achromats, and did not use ED or fluorite glass. Thus the heavy chromatic aberrations.

Rolando


-----Original Message-----
From: ROBERT WYNNE <robert-wynne@...>
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io; Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...>
Sent: Fri, Apr 30, 2021 3:11 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] [ap-ug] A colorful Southern Sky Beauty

Thanks for your reply. I suppose all these lenses are headed to the junk pile - even the fluorite aspheres. What a waste. Though I thought the focal point for all these lenses is the focal plane on the cameras body. If so how can these lenses designed to bring tack sharp images to the cameras focal plane not be adaptable to a ccd's focal plane at the same or an adapted focal plane? Something doesn't seem to add up here. Either that or lens design was sloppy back in the day. -Best, Robert
On 04/30/2021 12:44 PM Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...> wrote:
 
 
I did get an adapter for my 90mm focal length lens from the Pentax 6x7 medium format film camera. It's a very fast lens wide open F2.8, so I thought it would make an ideal wide field imaging system with either my Sony NEX7 digital camera or my astronomical CCD camera. Well, my first shot wide open produced 100 micron bloated stars in the center with quite severe chromatic aberration. Stopping it down to F8 helped some, but didn't really clean up until F11. At that point it had an aperture of only 8mm, not much more than a dark adapted human eyeball. So, pretty much none of the older film camera lenses, no matter how good they were back then, will hold a candle to a modern lens designed for a digital camera. Even a cheap and cheerful Rokinon will blow these old dinosaurs away.
 
Rolando


Roland Christen
 

Sure, my lens works fine at F11 and reasonably ok at F8, but that is stopping the 32mm clear aperture way down to pin-prick sizes. Not great for gathering light. Even a singlet lens will work when reduced to pinhole dimensions.

Rolando

-----Original Message-----
From: ayiomamitis <anthony@...>
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Sent: Fri, Apr 30, 2021 5:02 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] [ap-ug] A colorful Southern Sky Beauty

Gents,
I also have some Pentax 6x7 format lenses and I absolutely love them for daytime work and which happen to produce really sharp images when using both an APS as well as a full-frame sensor. If there is an interest, I would be happy to post some test results.
To be totally honest, I bought them for widefield astrophotography work at night but the extended quarantine the past 15 months has hindered my time under the night sky. I will make a note to myself to post links later this summer when I have something to show. We all agree that pinpoints of star light are the best test for any set of optics and which will make or break my satisfaction with the daytime results.
As an afterthought, here is something involving the setting Sun against the National Observatory of Athens which was shot with the Pentax 2x barlow lens as well and which means an effective aperture of f8 when used with the 200/f4 lens: http://www.perseus.gr/Astro-Solar-Scenes-Equinox-20180315.htm .
My Pentax 6x7 arsenal is comprised of the 75/f4.5, 105/f2.4 and 200/f4 lenses as well as the aforementioned Pentax 6x7 2x converter. I have been looking casually for the 150/165 lens as well as the 55mm offering which are supposedly to be very sharp as well (at least for daytime photos).
I would like to think that these lenses would generally be quite effective given the fact they had to satisfy a large piece of real estate (6" x 7") at the back of the camera.
Anthony.
On 01-May-21 00:43, Roland Christen via groups.io wrote:
They focus at the right point, they just are not sharp like modern digital designs made for 3 micron pixel size. There old lenses only had to be sharp enough for 50 micron film grain size. Most of them are achromats, and did not use ED or fluorite glass. Thus the heavy chromatic aberrations.

Rolando


-----Original Message-----
From: ROBERT WYNNE <robert-wynne@...>
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io; Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...>
Sent: Fri, Apr 30, 2021 3:11 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] [ap-ug] A colorful Southern Sky Beauty

Thanks for your reply. I suppose all these lenses are headed to the junk pile - even the fluorite aspheres. What a waste. Though I thought the focal point for all these lenses is the focal plane on the cameras body. If so how can these lenses designed to bring tack sharp images to the cameras focal plane not be adaptable to a ccd's focal plane at the same or an adapted focal plane? Something doesn't seem to add up here. Either that or lens design was sloppy back in the day. -Best, Robert
On 04/30/2021 12:44 PM Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...> wrote:
 
 
I did get an adapter for my 90mm focal length lens from the Pentax 6x7 medium format film camera. It's a very fast lens wide open F2.8, so I thought it would make an ideal wide field imaging system with either my Sony NEX7 digital camera or my astronomical CCD camera. Well, my first shot wide open produced 100 micron bloated stars in the center with quite severe chromatic aberration. Stopping it down to F8 helped some, but didn't really clean up until F11. At that point it had an aperture of only 8mm, not much more than a dark adapted human eyeball. So, pretty much none of the older film camera lenses, no matter how good they were back then, will hold a candle to a modern lens designed for a digital camera. Even a cheap and cheerful Rokinon will blow these old dinosaurs away.
 
Rolando


ayiomamitis
 

Rolando,

I have seen MANY stunning results taken with very humble equipment (ex Canon EOS 70-200/f4L) and one of the factors that comes into play is the field of view. If we want a widefield vista of the Milky Way showing the Rho Oph region, there is nothing wrong with using such lenses. Ditto for the Orion Nebula etc where aperture is not necessarily king.

Anthony.

On 01-May-21 02:22, Roland Christen via groups.io wrote:
Sure, my lens works fine at F11 and reasonably ok at F8, but that is stopping the 32mm clear aperture way down to pin-prick sizes. Not great for gathering light. Even a singlet lens will work when reduced to pinhole dimensions.

Rolando

-----Original Message-----
From: ayiomamitis <anthony@...>
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Sent: Fri, Apr 30, 2021 5:02 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] [ap-ug] A colorful Southern Sky Beauty

Gents,
I also have some Pentax 6x7 format lenses and I absolutely love them for daytime work and which happen to produce really sharp images when using both an APS as well as a full-frame sensor. If there is an interest, I would be happy to post some test results.
To be totally honest, I bought them for widefield astrophotography work at night but the extended quarantine the past 15 months has hindered my time under the night sky. I will make a note to myself to post links later this summer when I have something to show. We all agree that pinpoints of star light are the best test for any set of optics and which will make or break my satisfaction with the daytime results.
As an afterthought, here is something involving the setting Sun against the National Observatory of Athens which was shot with the Pentax 2x barlow lens as well and which means an effective aperture of f8 when used with the 200/f4 lens: http://www.perseus.gr/Astro-Solar-Scenes-Equinox-20180315.htm .
My Pentax 6x7 arsenal is comprised of the 75/f4.5, 105/f2.4 and 200/f4 lenses as well as the aforementioned Pentax 6x7 2x converter. I have been looking casually for the 150/165 lens as well as the 55mm offering which are supposedly to be very sharp as well (at least for daytime photos).
I would like to think that these lenses would generally be quite effective given the fact they had to satisfy a large piece of real estate (6" x 7") at the back of the camera.
Anthony.
On 01-May-21 00:43, Roland Christen via groups.io wrote:
They focus at the right point, they just are not sharp like modern digital designs made for 3 micron pixel size. There old lenses only had to be sharp enough for 50 micron film grain size. Most of them are achromats, and did not use ED or fluorite glass. Thus the heavy chromatic aberrations.

Rolando


-----Original Message-----
From: ROBERT WYNNE <robert-wynne@...>
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io; Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...>
Sent: Fri, Apr 30, 2021 3:11 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] [ap-ug] A colorful Southern Sky Beauty

Thanks for your reply. I suppose all these lenses are headed to the junk pile - even the fluorite aspheres. What a waste. Though I thought the focal point for all these lenses is the focal plane on the cameras body. If so how can these lenses designed to bring tack sharp images to the cameras focal plane not be adaptable to a ccd's focal plane at the same or an adapted focal plane? Something doesn't seem to add up here. Either that or lens design was sloppy back in the day. -Best, Robert
On 04/30/2021 12:44 PM Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...> wrote:
 
 
I did get an adapter for my 90mm focal length lens from the Pentax 6x7 medium format film camera. It's a very fast lens wide open F2.8, so I thought it would make an ideal wide field imaging system with either my Sony NEX7 digital camera or my astronomical CCD camera. Well, my first shot wide open produced 100 micron bloated stars in the center with quite severe chromatic aberration. Stopping it down to F8 helped some, but didn't really clean up until F11. At that point it had an aperture of only 8mm, not much more than a dark adapted human eyeball. So, pretty much none of the older film camera lenses, no matter how good they were back then, will hold a candle to a modern lens designed for a digital camera. Even a cheap and cheerful Rokinon will blow these old dinosaurs away.
 
Rolando


Roland Christen
 


I have seen MANY stunning results taken with very humble equipment (ex Canon EOS 70-200/f4L)
Sure, I agree, but that is not one of the old lenses made for film cameras. The original question was how good those old film camera lenses were. The answer that I got from my Pentax lens was - basically horrible at full aperture. Stopped down to near pinhole size - ok but very little light gathering power. Compared to a cheap and cheerful Rokinon that i bought for Milky way imaging, the old lens doesn't come close. The Rokinon is sharp even wide open. Take a look at my recent image that i posted of the Zodiacal Light. That was taken with the Rokinon at F2.

I have old Nikon lenses, including the original all-around 50mm F1.4 lens that most people used with their 35mm Nikon film cameras. Wide open it gathers a lot of light. Unfortunately that light is spread out over a huge blur circle, especially in the blue and red end, so that bright stars all have huge halos. These lenses were basically achromats, and fast achromats have horrible chromatic aberrations.

Rolando


-----Original Message-----
From: ayiomamitis <anthony@...>
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Sent: Sat, May 1, 2021 2:59 am
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] [ap-ug] A colorful Southern Sky Beauty

Rolando,
I have seen MANY stunning results taken with very humble equipment (ex Canon EOS 70-200/f4L) and one of the factors that comes into play is the field of view. If we want a widefield vista of the Milky Way showing the Rho Oph region, there is nothing wrong with using such lenses. Ditto for the Orion Nebula etc where aperture is not necessarily king.
Anthony.
On 01-May-21 02:22, Roland Christen via groups.io wrote:
Sure, my lens works fine at F11 and reasonably ok at F8, but that is stopping the 32mm clear aperture way down to pin-prick sizes. Not great for gathering light. Even a singlet lens will work when reduced to pinhole dimensions.

Rolando

-----Original Message-----
From: ayiomamitis <anthony@...>
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Sent: Fri, Apr 30, 2021 5:02 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] [ap-ug] A colorful Southern Sky Beauty

Gents,
I also have some Pentax 6x7 format lenses and I absolutely love them for daytime work and which happen to produce really sharp images when using both an APS as well as a full-frame sensor. If there is an interest, I would be happy to post some test results.
To be totally honest, I bought them for widefield astrophotography work at night but the extended quarantine the past 15 months has hindered my time under the night sky. I will make a note to myself to post links later this summer when I have something to show. We all agree that pinpoints of star light are the best test for any set of optics and which will make or break my satisfaction with the daytime results.
As an afterthought, here is something involving the setting Sun against the National Observatory of Athens which was shot with the Pentax 2x barlow lens as well and which means an effective aperture of f8 when used with the 200/f4 lens: http://www.perseus.gr/Astro-Solar-Scenes-Equinox-20180315.htm .
My Pentax 6x7 arsenal is comprised of the 75/f4.5, 105/f2.4 and 200/f4 lenses as well as the aforementioned Pentax 6x7 2x converter. I have been looking casually for the 150/165 lens as well as the 55mm offering which are supposedly to be very sharp as well (at least for daytime photos).
I would like to think that these lenses would generally be quite effective given the fact they had to satisfy a large piece of real estate (6" x 7") at the back of the camera.
Anthony.
On 01-May-21 00:43, Roland Christen via groups.io wrote:
They focus at the right point, they just are not sharp like modern digital designs made for 3 micron pixel size. There old lenses only had to be sharp enough for 50 micron film grain size. Most of them are achromats, and did not use ED or fluorite glass. Thus the heavy chromatic aberrations.

Rolando


-----Original Message-----
From: ROBERT WYNNE <robert-wynne@...>
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io; Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...>
Sent: Fri, Apr 30, 2021 3:11 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] [ap-ug] A colorful Southern Sky Beauty

Thanks for your reply. I suppose all these lenses are headed to the junk pile - even the fluorite aspheres. What a waste. Though I thought the focal point for all these lenses is the focal plane on the cameras body. If so how can these lenses designed to bring tack sharp images to the cameras focal plane not be adaptable to a ccd's focal plane at the same or an adapted focal plane? Something doesn't seem to add up here. Either that or lens design was sloppy back in the day. -Best, Robert
On 04/30/2021 12:44 PM Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...> wrote:
 
 
I did get an adapter for my 90mm focal length lens from the Pentax 6x7 medium format film camera. It's a very fast lens wide open F2.8, so I thought it would make an ideal wide field imaging system with either my Sony NEX7 digital camera or my astronomical CCD camera. Well, my first shot wide open produced 100 micron bloated stars in the center with quite severe chromatic aberration. Stopping it down to F8 helped some, but didn't really clean up until F11. At that point it had an aperture of only 8mm, not much more than a dark adapted human eyeball. So, pretty much none of the older film camera lenses, no matter how good they were back then, will hold a candle to a modern lens designed for a digital camera. Even a cheap and cheerful Rokinon will blow these old dinosaurs away.
 
Rolando


ayiomamitis
 

Rolando,

Let's continue this subject over the summer when I expect to have some results using my Pentax 67 lenses.

As for your Rokinon, I agree that it is an incredible sharp lens even wide open (I have the Samyang version of the same lens). Also, just the other day, a friend posted something with the Samyang 20mm lens which was also impressively sharp and which made me particularly happy since I need something around 20mm focal length.

Anthony.

On 01-May-21 18:08, Roland Christen via groups.io wrote:

I have seen MANY stunning results taken with very humble equipment (ex Canon EOS 70-200/f4L)
Sure, I agree, but that is not one of the old lenses made for film cameras. The original question was how good those old film camera lenses were. The answer that I got from my Pentax lens was - basically horrible at full aperture. Stopped down to near pinhole size - ok but very little light gathering power. Compared to a cheap and cheerful Rokinon that i bought for Milky way imaging, the old lens doesn't come close. The Rokinon is sharp even wide open. Take a look at my recent image that i posted of the Zodiacal Light. That was taken with the Rokinon at F2.

I have old Nikon lenses, including the original all-around 50mm F1.4 lens that most people used with their 35mm Nikon film cameras. Wide open it gathers a lot of light. Unfortunately that light is spread out over a huge blur circle, especially in the blue and red end, so that bright stars all have huge halos. These lenses were basically achromats, and fast achromats have horrible chromatic aberrations.

Rolando


-----Original Message-----
From: ayiomamitis <anthony@...>
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Sent: Sat, May 1, 2021 2:59 am
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] [ap-ug] A colorful Southern Sky Beauty

Rolando,
I have seen MANY stunning results taken with very humble equipment (ex Canon EOS 70-200/f4L) and one of the factors that comes into play is the field of view. If we want a widefield vista of the Milky Way showing the Rho Oph region, there is nothing wrong with using such lenses. Ditto for the Orion Nebula etc where aperture is not necessarily king.
Anthony.
On 01-May-21 02:22, Roland Christen via groups.io wrote:
Sure, my lens works fine at F11 and reasonably ok at F8, but that is stopping the 32mm clear aperture way down to pin-prick sizes. Not great for gathering light. Even a singlet lens will work when reduced to pinhole dimensions.

Rolando

-----Original Message-----
From: ayiomamitis <anthony@...>
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Sent: Fri, Apr 30, 2021 5:02 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] [ap-ug] A colorful Southern Sky Beauty

Gents,
I also have some Pentax 6x7 format lenses and I absolutely love them for daytime work and which happen to produce really sharp images when using both an APS as well as a full-frame sensor. If there is an interest, I would be happy to post some test results.
To be totally honest, I bought them for widefield astrophotography work at night but the extended quarantine the past 15 months has hindered my time under the night sky. I will make a note to myself to post links later this summer when I have something to show. We all agree that pinpoints of star light are the best test for any set of optics and which will make or break my satisfaction with the daytime results.
As an afterthought, here is something involving the setting Sun against the National Observatory of Athens which was shot with the Pentax 2x barlow lens as well and which means an effective aperture of f8 when used with the 200/f4 lens: http://www.perseus.gr/Astro-Solar-Scenes-Equinox-20180315.htm .
My Pentax 6x7 arsenal is comprised of the 75/f4.5, 105/f2.4 and 200/f4 lenses as well as the aforementioned Pentax 6x7 2x converter. I have been looking casually for the 150/165 lens as well as the 55mm offering which are supposedly to be very sharp as well (at least for daytime photos).
I would like to think that these lenses would generally be quite effective given the fact they had to satisfy a large piece of real estate (6" x 7") at the back of the camera.
Anthony.
On 01-May-21 00:43, Roland Christen via groups.io wrote:
They focus at the right point, they just are not sharp like modern digital designs made for 3 micron pixel size. There old lenses only had to be sharp enough for 50 micron film grain size. Most of them are achromats, and did not use ED or fluorite glass. Thus the heavy chromatic aberrations.

Rolando


-----Original Message-----
From: ROBERT WYNNE <robert-wynne@...>
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io; Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...>
Sent: Fri, Apr 30, 2021 3:11 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] [ap-ug] A colorful Southern Sky Beauty

Thanks for your reply. I suppose all these lenses are headed to the junk pile - even the fluorite aspheres. What a waste. Though I thought the focal point for all these lenses is the focal plane on the cameras body. If so how can these lenses designed to bring tack sharp images to the cameras focal plane not be adaptable to a ccd's focal plane at the same or an adapted focal plane? Something doesn't seem to add up here. Either that or lens design was sloppy back in the day. -Best, Robert
On 04/30/2021 12:44 PM Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...> wrote:
 
 
I did get an adapter for my 90mm focal length lens from the Pentax 6x7 medium format film camera. It's a very fast lens wide open F2.8, so I thought it would make an ideal wide field imaging system with either my Sony NEX7 digital camera or my astronomical CCD camera. Well, my first shot wide open produced 100 micron bloated stars in the center with quite severe chromatic aberration. Stopping it down to F8 helped some, but didn't really clean up until F11. At that point it had an aperture of only 8mm, not much more than a dark adapted human eyeball. So, pretty much none of the older film camera lenses, no matter how good they were back then, will hold a candle to a modern lens designed for a digital camera. Even a cheap and cheerful Rokinon will blow these old dinosaurs away.
 
Rolando