Funny Stories


Christopher M
 
Edited

With enough negativity going on around, I thought I might start a thread wondering if anyone had any funny stories to share related to their AP equipment.  To start it, I thought I migh tell the story of how I acquired my first AP telescope: my 130EDT, aka "Precious".
I have a terrible habbit of looking through the astro classifieds in the US and Canada and one day I noticed an AP130EDT f8.35 showing for sale in Ottawa ON.  I'm in Calgary AB, which is North of MT while Ottawa is North of NY, or ~3500km or ~2200mi away.  I discussed it with my friends and mentors here, Rick and John.  The listing stayed active for a bit.  The price had come down from what it was initially.  Hmm.  No one had grabbed it?  Was something wrong with it?  So I contacted the lister and we went through a number of checks by email, phone and video, and then I decided to purchase it.  Normal so far.  Then we looked at shipping it.  Estimates came in close to C$900 via Fedex and then they wouldn't insure it as it is "glass" and they don't cover glass breakage.  Err..  In short, I took a red-eye flight out to Ottawa, rented a car and drove out to the seller's place in the country with a cashier's cheque, pre-arranged, of course.  We verified the telescope condition etc and concluded the transaction.  Then we packed it for the return flight.  The lens cell was removed, wrapped and sandwiched in two wooden end caps that I turned on my lathe.  That was taped together then into a ziplock bag then into a small Pelican case with padding which was then into a carry-on suitcase which is more descrete than a Pelican case.  The tube went back into the case (with end caps on) which was then wrapped and boxed for airline checked baggage level handling.  Accessories went into my "personal item" backpack.  No issues with airport security.  They X-rayed it, of course, and then asked to see the contents.  I told them it was expensive optics and they kindly handled it carefully, doing  a careful opening, verifying it wasn't an issue, then equally careful repacking and let me continue.  For my return flight, I upgraded my seat so that the oversized tube assembly had minimal extra cost, receiving a nice meal and celebratory drinks on the return to boot.  With the flights and even car rental, it was cheaper than the shipping estimate from Fedex for either overnight or 2 day (I forget which).  Plus I got to meet the seller to chat about and enjoy audio systems.  When home it all went together without a hitch (we marked the lens cell to tube alignment with painters tape) and I have my "Precious" (think Lord of the Rings - the One Ring).  The added fun was when I picked up the oversized box at the airport baggage area, I realised that airport security had unpacked the tube carton, carefully unwrapped it, checked it, and carefuly wrapped it back up again.  They must have thought it was something .... else.  It took the seller and I about half an hour to wrap and package the tube and case into the cardboard box so it must have taken them about as long, the poor staff.  If it wasn't for their security tape, I wouldn't have known.
       

And to add to the humour, 1yr I think to the month after I acquired Precious, my name came up on the wait list for a new production AP130.  That was a tough decision, but in the end I decided to keep Precious and let someone else enjoy a new AP130.  Last year Precious acquired a sibling when I became the proud owner of a new Stowaway 92 (upgrading from my venerable Grab N Go Vixen ED81) starting me down this finicky road of astro and terrestrial photography with both.  :)  
My first "presentable" picture with the 130:



Cheers and Keep Safe everyone!
Christopher

PS - thanks to John Mirtle and Rick Keppler for mentoring me.  John has his own AP130EDT so we joke about making a very large pair of binoculars with them, somehow...
PPS - thanks to Daleen and George's at AP, as well as Christine Simpson and Dena Joseph at Starlight for all your patience.  My 130 has a new 2spd focuser w HSM30 and both have a myriad of accessories.  I suspect Daleen has my CC on speed dial...
PPPS - I think my 130EDT belonged to Stuart Heggie at one point.  Thanks Stuart.  :)


James Stone
 

My story isn’t quite as detailed. A listing was posted for a 5” f6, a piece of AP history. The seller wasn’t able to make it out to ship it and it was out on the west coast. After giving it some thought and coordinating with the seller, I ended up calling an Uber to have the scope picked up from the seller and taken to a local shipping store. It was a nail biter of a 25 minutes during the Uber ride but all worked out well. 


On Sep 24, 2021, at 8:04 PM, Christopher M <mirfak@...> wrote:



[Edited Message Follows]

With enough negativity going on around, I thought I might start a thread wondering if anyone had any funny stories to share related to their AP equipment.  To start it, I thought I migh tell the story of how I acquired my first AP telescope: my 130EDT, aka "Precious".
I have a terrible habbit of looking through the astro classifieds in the US and Canada and one day I noticed an AP130EDT f8.35 showing for sale in Ottawa ON.  I'm in Calgary AB, which is North of MT while Ottawa is North of NY, or ~3500km or ~2200mi away.  I discussed it with my friends and mentors here, Rick and John.  The listing stayed active for a bit.  The price had come down from what it was initially.  Hmm.  No one had grabbed it?  Was something wrong with it?  So I contacted the lister and we went through a number of checks by email, phone and video, and then I decided to purchase it.  Normal so far.  Then we looked at shipping it.  Estimates came in close to C$900 via Fedex and then they wouldn't insure it as it is "glass" and they don't cover glass breakage.  Err..  In short, I took a red-eye flight out to Ottawa, rented a car and drove out to the seller's place in the country with a cashier's cheque, pre-arranged, of course.  We verified the telescope condition etc and concluded the transaction.  Then we packed it for the return flight.  The lens cell was removed, wrapped and sandwiched in two wooden end caps that I turned on my lathe.  That was taped together then into a ziplock bag then into a small Pelican case with padding which was then into a carry-on suitcase which is more descrete than a Pelican case.  The tube went back into the case (with end caps on) which was then wrapped and boxed for airline checked baggage level handling.  Accessories went into my "personal item" backpack.  No issues with airport security.  They X-rayed it, of course, and then asked to see the contents.  I told them it was expensive optics and they kindly handled it carefully, doing  a careful opening, verifying it wasn't an issue, then equally careful repacking and let me continue.  For my return flight, I upgraded my seat so that the oversized tube assembly had minimal extra cost, receiving a nice meal and celebratory drinks on the return to boot.  With the flights and even car rental, it was cheaper than the shipping estimate from Fedex for either overnight or 2 day (I forget which).  Plus I got to meet the seller to chat about and enjoy audio systems.  When home it all went together without a hitch (we marked the lens cell to tube alignment with painters tape) and I have my "Precious" (think Lord of the Rings - the One Ring).  The added fun was when I picked up the oversized box at the airport baggage area, I realised that airport security had unpacked the tube carton, carefully unwrapped it, checked it, and carefuly wrapped it back up again.  They must have thought it was something .... else.  It took the seller and I about half an hour to wrap and package the tube and case into the cardboard box so it must have taken them about as long, the poor staff.  If it wasn't for their security tape, I wouldn't have known.
<IMG_1201.jpeg>
  
<IMG_1202.jpeg>
  
<Cart.jpg>
 
<IMG_1224.jpeg>
  
<IMG_1315.jpeg>


And to add to the humour, 1yr I think to the month after I acquired Precious, my name came up on the wait list for a new production AP130.  That was a tough decision, but in the end I decided to keep Precious and let someone else enjoy a new AP130.  Last year Precious acquired a sibling when I became the proud owner of a new Stowaway 92 (upgrading from my venerable Grab N Go Vixen ED81) starting me down this finicky road of astro and terrestrial photography with both.  :)  
My first "presentable" picture with the 130:
<M13 Sept 0321.jpg>


Cheers and Keep Safe everyone!
Christopher

PS - thanks to John Mirtle and Rick Keppler for mentoring me.  John has his own AP130EDT so we joke about making a very large pair of binoculars with them, somehow...
PPS - thanks to Daleen and George's at AP, as well as Christine Simpson and Dena Joseph at Starlight for all your patience.  My 130 has a new 2spd focuser w HSM30 and both have a myriad of accessories.  I suspect Daleen has my CC on speed dial...
PPPS - I think my 130EDT belonged to Stuart Heggie at one point.  Thanks Stuart.  :)


DFisch
 

Christopher, What a great and multifaceted story. A great name for a telescope too after such an adventure, thanks for sharing your wonderful story!

TJF Mobile
please excuse grammar and spell errors


From: main@ap-ug.groups.io <main@ap-ug.groups.io> on behalf of James Stone <jrs7r@...>
Sent: Friday, September 24, 2021 8:12:57 PM
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io <main@ap-ug.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [ap-ug] Funny Stories
 
My story isn’t quite as detailed. A listing was posted for a 5” f6, a piece of AP history. The seller wasn’t able to make it out to ship it and it was out on the west coast. After giving it some thought and coordinating with the seller, I ended up calling an Uber to have the scope picked up from the seller and taken to a local shipping store. It was a nail biter of a 25 minutes during the Uber ride but all worked out well. 


On Sep 24, 2021, at 8:04 PM, Christopher M <mirfak@...> wrote:



[Edited Message Follows]

With enough negativity going on around, I thought I might start a thread wondering if anyone had any funny stories to share related to their AP equipment.  To start it, I thought I migh tell the story of how I acquired my first AP telescope: my 130EDT, aka "Precious".
I have a terrible habbit of looking through the astro classifieds in the US and Canada and one day I noticed an AP130EDT f8.35 showing for sale in Ottawa ON.  I'm in Calgary AB, which is North of MT while Ottawa is North of NY, or ~3500km or ~2200mi away.  I discussed it with my friends and mentors here, Rick and John.  The listing stayed active for a bit.  The price had come down from what it was initially.  Hmm.  No one had grabbed it?  Was something wrong with it?  So I contacted the lister and we went through a number of checks by email, phone and video, and then I decided to purchase it.  Normal so far.  Then we looked at shipping it.  Estimates came in close to C$900 via Fedex and then they wouldn't insure it as it is "glass" and they don't cover glass breakage.  Err..  In short, I took a red-eye flight out to Ottawa, rented a car and drove out to the seller's place in the country with a cashier's cheque, pre-arranged, of course.  We verified the telescope condition etc and concluded the transaction.  Then we packed it for the return flight.  The lens cell was removed, wrapped and sandwiched in two wooden end caps that I turned on my lathe.  That was taped together then into a ziplock bag then into a small Pelican case with padding which was then into a carry-on suitcase which is more descrete than a Pelican case.  The tube went back into the case (with end caps on) which was then wrapped and boxed for airline checked baggage level handling.  Accessories went into my "personal item" backpack.  No issues with airport security.  They X-rayed it, of course, and then asked to see the contents.  I told them it was expensive optics and they kindly handled it carefully, doing  a careful opening, verifying it wasn't an issue, then equally careful repacking and let me continue.  For my return flight, I upgraded my seat so that the oversized tube assembly had minimal extra cost, receiving a nice meal and celebratory drinks on the return to boot.  With the flights and even car rental, it was cheaper than the shipping estimate from Fedex for either overnight or 2 day (I forget which).  Plus I got to meet the seller to chat about and enjoy audio systems.  When home it all went together without a hitch (we marked the lens cell to tube alignment with painters tape) and I have my "Precious" (think Lord of the Rings - the One Ring).  The added fun was when I picked up the oversized box at the airport baggage area, I realised that airport security had unpacked the tube carton, carefully unwrapped it, checked it, and carefuly wrapped it back up again.  They must have thought it was something .... else.  It took the seller and I about half an hour to wrap and package the tube and case into the cardboard box so it must have taken them about as long, the poor staff.  If it wasn't for their security tape, I wouldn't have known.
<IMG_1201.jpeg>
  
<IMG_1202.jpeg>
  
<Cart.jpg>
 
<IMG_1224.jpeg>
  
<IMG_1315.jpeg>


And to add to the humour, 1yr I think to the month after I acquired Precious, my name came up on the wait list for a new production AP130.  That was a tough decision, but in the end I decided to keep Precious and let someone else enjoy a new AP130.  Last year Precious acquired a sibling when I became the proud owner of a new Stowaway 92 (upgrading from my venerable Grab N Go Vixen ED81) starting me down this finicky road of astro and terrestrial photography with both.  :)  
My first "presentable" picture with the 130:
<M13 Sept 0321.jpg>


Cheers and Keep Safe everyone!
Christopher

PS - thanks to John Mirtle and Rick Keppler for mentoring me.  John has his own AP130EDT so we joke about making a very large pair of binoculars with them, somehow...
PPS - thanks to Daleen and George's at AP, as well as Christine Simpson and Dena Joseph at Starlight for all your patience.  My 130 has a new 2spd focuser w HSM30 and both have a myriad of accessories.  I suspect Daleen has my CC on speed dial...
PPPS - I think my 130EDT belonged to Stuart Heggie at one point.  Thanks Stuart.  :)


Christopher M
 

Thanks  :)  Sorry about the edits everyone.  I was struggling with the photos....


Stuart
 

Chris, that is a great story and YES, I was the owner prior to the fellow you bought it from in Ottawa. I got it from a chap in Georgetown (Ontario) who got it from the original owner. What a journey that scope has had! It is a great scope and I am so glad you're getting so much good use out of it.


On Fri, 24 Sept 2021 at 19:55, Christopher M <mirfak@...> wrote:
With enough negativity going on around, I thought I might start a thread wondering if anyone had any funny stories to share related to their AP equipment.  To start it, I thought I migh tell the story of how I acquired my first AP telescope: my 130EDT, aka "Precious".
I have a terrible habbit of looking through the astro classifieds in the US and Canada and one day I noticed an AP130EDT f8.35 showing for sale in Ottawa ON.  I'm in Calgary AB, which is North of MT while Ottawa is North of NY, or ~3500km or ~2200mi away.  I discussed it with my friends and mentors here, Rick and John.  The listing stayed active for a bit.  The price had come down from what it was initially.  Hmm.  So I contacted the lister and we went through a number of checks by email, phone and video, and then I decided to purchase it.  Normal so far.  Then we looked at shipping it.  Estimates came in close to C$900 via Fedex and then they wouldn't insure it as it is "glass" and they don't cover glass breakage.  Err..  In short, I took a red-eye flight out to Ottawa, rented a car and drove out to the seller's place in the country with a cashier's cheque, pre-arranged, of course.  We verified the telescope condition etc and concluded the transaction.  Then we packed it for the return flight.  The lens cell was removed, wrapped and sandwiched in two wooden end caps that I turned on my lathe.  That was taped together then into a ziplock bag then into a small Pelican case with padding which was then into a carry-on suitcase which is more descrete than a Pelican case.  The tube went back into the case (with end caps on) which was then wrapped and boxed for airline checked baggage level handling.  Accessories went into my "personal item" backpack.  No issues with airport security.  They X-rayed it, of course, and then asked to see the contents.  I told them it was expensive optics and they kindly handled it carefully, doing  a careful opening, verifying it wasn't an issue, then equally careful repacking and let me continue.  For my return flight, I upgraded my seat so that the oversized tube assembly had minimal extra cost, receiving a nice meal and celebratory drinks on the return to boot.  With the flights and even car rental, it was cheaper than the shipping estimate from Fedex for either overnight or 2 day (I forget which).  Plus I got to meet the seller to chat about and enjoy audio systems.  When home it all went together without a hitch (we marked the lens cell to tube alignment with painters tape) and I have my "Precious" (think Lord of the Rings - the One Ring).  The added fun was when I picked up the oversized box at the airport baggage area, I realised that airport security had unpacked the tube carton, carefully unwrapped it, checked it, and carefuly wrapped it back up again.  They must have thought it was something .... else.  It took the seller and I about half an hour to wrap and package the tube and case into the cardboard box so it must have taken them about as long, the poor staff.  If it wasn't for their security tape, I wouldn't have known.
       

And to add to the humour, 1yr I think to the month after I acquired Precious, my name came up on the wait list for a new production AP130.  That was a tough decision, but in the end I decided to keep Precious and let someone else enjoy a new AP130.  Last year Precious acquired a sibling when I became the proud owner of a new Stowaway 92 (upgrading from my venerable Grab N Go Vixen ED81) starting me down this finicky road of astro and terrestrial photography with both.  :)  
My first "presentable" picture with the 130:


Cheers and Keep Safe everyone!
Christopher

PS - thanks to John Mirtle and Rick Keppler for mentoring me.  John has his own AP130EDT so we joke about making a very large pair of binoculars with them, somehow...
PPS - thanks to Daleen and George's at AP, as well as Christine Simpson and Dena Joseph at Starlight for all your patience.  My 130 has a new 2spd focuser w HSM30 and both have a myriad of accessories.  I suspect Daleen has my CC on speed dial...
PPPS - I think my 130EDT belonged to Stuart Heggie at one point.  Thanks Stuart.  :)


Christopher M
 

There is always that bit of fear when doing a big but portable transaction.  I'm glad it worked out well for you.


thefamily90 Phillips
 

My story isn’t that funny but very memorable to me. Purchased from a Dear Friend, Harvey M who passed away last February.
Are we had been on the list for an AP 130 F/8.35 but did not make the cut. In the meantime, he contacted Tom Back and had a  LZOS 130 F/9.2 made. He only purchased the lens as he made the OTA himself. Then he received an email from AP that they had ended up with an extra AP 130! Did he want it? Well, of course he did. He compared the two telescopes back-and-forth for many years. He never sold anything but, for some reason agree to sell me the AP 130. His conclusion after testing both, side-by-side for years was if they were as near to perfection as any telescope he had ever seen. His AP F/8.35 is number 60, one of the very last ones made. I can confirm that it is a superb telescope.

JimP

Image.jpegImage.jpeg



From: main@ap-ug.groups.io <main@ap-ug.groups.io> on behalf of Christopher M <mirfak@...>
Sent: Friday, September 24, 2021 10:30:43 PM
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io <main@ap-ug.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [ap-ug] Funny Stories
 
There is always that bit of fear when doing a big but portable transaction.  I'm glad it worked out well for you.

--
Jim Phillips


James Stone
 

Jim, great background story on a fine instrument. Thank you for sharing this.

 

From: <main@ap-ug.groups.io> on behalf of thefamily90 Phillips <thefamily90@...>
Reply-To: "main@ap-ug.groups.io" <main@ap-ug.groups.io>
Date: Saturday, September 25, 2021 at 9:47 AM
To: "main@ap-ug.groups.io" <main@ap-ug.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [ap-ug] Funny Stories

 

My story isn’t that funny but very memorable to me. Purchased from a Dear Friend, Harvey M who passed away last February.

Are we had been on the list for an AP 130 F/8.35 but did not make the cut. In the meantime, he contacted Tom Back and had a  LZOS 130 F/9.2 made. He only purchased the lens as he made the OTA himself. Then he received an email from AP that they had ended up with an extra AP 130! Did he want it? Well, of course he did. He compared the two telescopes back-and-forth for many years. He never sold anything but, for some reason agree to sell me the AP 130. His conclusion after testing both, side-by-side for years was if they were as near to perfection as any telescope he had ever seen. His AP F/8.35 is number 60, one of the very last ones made. I can confirm that it is a superb telescope.

 

JimP

 

Image.jpegImage.jpeg

 

 


From: main@ap-ug.groups.io <main@ap-ug.groups.io> on behalf of Christopher M <mirfak@...>
Sent: Friday, September 24, 2021 10:30:43 PM
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io <main@ap-ug.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [ap-ug] Funny Stories

 

There is always that bit of fear when doing a big but portable transaction.  I'm glad it worked out well for you.


--
Jim Phillips


 

Christopher,

 

What a great story! I loved it.

 

Clear Skies,

Marj Christen

Astro-Physics

11250 Forest Hills Road

Machesney Park, IL 61115

Phone: 815-282-1513

www.astro-physics.com

 

From: main@ap-ug.groups.io <main@ap-ug.groups.io> On Behalf Of Christopher M
Sent: Friday, September 24, 2021 6:56 PM
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Subject: [ap-ug] Funny Stories

 

[Edited Message Follows]

With enough negativity going on around, I thought I might start a thread wondering if anyone had any funny stories to share related to their AP equipment.  To start it, I thought I migh tell the story of how I acquired my first AP telescope: my 130EDT, aka "Precious".
I have a terrible habbit of looking through the astro classifieds in the US and Canada and one day I noticed an AP130EDT f8.35 showing for sale in Ottawa ON.  I'm in Calgary AB, which is North of MT while Ottawa is North of NY, or ~3500km or ~2200mi away.  I discussed it with my friends and mentors here, Rick and John.  The listing stayed active for a bit.  The price had come down from what it was initially.  Hmm.  No one had grabbed it?  Was something wrong with it?  So I contacted the lister and we went through a number of checks by email, phone and video, and then I decided to purchase it.  Normal so far.  Then we looked at shipping it.  Estimates came in close to C$900 via Fedex and then they wouldn't insure it as it is "glass" and they don't cover glass breakage.  Err..  In short, I took a red-eye flight out to Ottawa, rented a car and drove out to the seller's place in the country with a cashier's cheque, pre-arranged, of course.  We verified the telescope condition etc and concluded the transaction.  Then we packed it for the return flight.  The lens cell was removed, wrapped and sandwiched in two wooden end caps that I turned on my lathe.  That was taped together then into a ziplock bag then into a small Pelican case with padding which was then into a carry-on suitcase which is more descrete than a Pelican case.  The tube went back into the case (with end caps on) which was then wrapped and boxed for airline checked baggage level handling.  Accessories went into my "personal item" backpack.  No issues with airport security.  They X-rayed it, of course, and then asked to see the contents.  I told them it was expensive optics and they kindly handled it carefully, doing  a careful opening, verifying it wasn't an issue, then equally careful repacking and let me continue.  For my return flight, I upgraded my seat so that the oversized tube assembly had minimal extra cost, receiving a nice meal and celebratory drinks on the return to boot.  With the flights and even car rental, it was cheaper than the shipping estimate from Fedex for either overnight or 2 day (I forget which).  Plus I got to meet the seller to chat about and enjoy audio systems.  When home it all went together without a hitch (we marked the lens cell to tube alignment with painters tape) and I have my "Precious" (think Lord of the Rings - the One Ring).  The added fun was when I picked up the oversized box at the airport baggage area, I realised that airport security had unpacked the tube carton, carefully unwrapped it, checked it, and carefuly wrapped it back up again.  They must have thought it was something .... else.  It took the seller and I about half an hour to wrap and package the tube and case into the cardboard box so it must have taken them about as long, the poor staff.  If it wasn't for their security tape, I wouldn't have known.
       

And to add to the humour, 1yr I think to the month after I acquired Precious, my name came up on the wait list for a new production AP130.  That was a tough decision, but in the end I decided to keep Precious and let someone else enjoy a new AP130.  Last year Precious acquired a sibling when I became the proud owner of a new Stowaway 92 (upgrading from my venerable Grab N Go Vixen ED81) starting me down this finicky road of astro and terrestrial photography with both.  :)  
My first "presentable" picture with the 130:



Cheers and Keep Safe everyone!
Christopher

PS - thanks to John Mirtle and Rick Keppler for mentoring me.  John has his own AP130EDT so we joke about making a very large pair of binoculars with them, somehow...
PPS - thanks to Daleen and George's at AP, as well as Christine Simpson and Dena Joseph at Starlight for all your patience.  My 130 has a new 2spd focuser w HSM30 and both have a myriad of accessories.  I suspect Daleen has my CC on speed dial...
PPPS - I think my 130EDT belonged to Stuart Heggie at one point.  Thanks Stuart.  :)


 

James,

 

That was a very inventive and brave solution!

 

Clear Skies,

Marj Christen

Astro-Physics

11250 Forest Hills Road

Machesney Park, IL 61115

Phone: 815-282-1513

www.astro-physics.com

 

From: main@ap-ug.groups.io <main@ap-ug.groups.io> On Behalf Of James Stone
Sent: Friday, September 24, 2021 7:13 PM
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-ug] Funny Stories

 

My story isn’t quite as detailed. A listing was posted for a 5” f6, a piece of AP history. The seller wasn’t able to make it out to ship it and it was out on the west coast. After giving it some thought and coordinating with the seller, I ended up calling an Uber to have the scope picked up from the seller and taken to a local shipping store. It was a nail biter of a 25 minutes during the Uber ride but all worked out well. 



On Sep 24, 2021, at 8:04 PM, Christopher M <mirfak@...> wrote:



[Edited Message Follows]

With enough negativity going on around, I thought I might start a thread wondering if anyone had any funny stories to share related to their AP equipment.  To start it, I thought I migh tell the story of how I acquired my first AP telescope: my 130EDT, aka "Precious".
I have a terrible habbit of looking through the astro classifieds in the US and Canada and one day I noticed an AP130EDT f8.35 showing for sale in Ottawa ON.  I'm in Calgary AB, which is North of MT while Ottawa is North of NY, or ~3500km or ~2200mi away.  I discussed it with my friends and mentors here, Rick and John.  The listing stayed active for a bit.  The price had come down from what it was initially.  Hmm.  No one had grabbed it?  Was something wrong with it?  So I contacted the lister and we went through a number of checks by email, phone and video, and then I decided to purchase it.  Normal so far.  Then we looked at shipping it.  Estimates came in close to C$900 via Fedex and then they wouldn't insure it as it is "glass" and they don't cover glass breakage.  Err..  In short, I took a red-eye flight out to Ottawa, rented a car and drove out to the seller's place in the country with a cashier's cheque, pre-arranged, of course.  We verified the telescope condition etc and concluded the transaction.  Then we packed it for the return flight.  The lens cell was removed, wrapped and sandwiched in two wooden end caps that I turned on my lathe.  That was taped together then into a ziplock bag then into a small Pelican case with padding which was then into a carry-on suitcase which is more descrete than a Pelican case.  The tube went back into the case (with end caps on) which was then wrapped and boxed for airline checked baggage level handling.  Accessories went into my "personal item" backpack.  No issues with airport security.  They X-rayed it, of course, and then asked to see the contents.  I told them it was expensive optics and they kindly handled it carefully, doing  a careful opening, verifying it wasn't an issue, then equally careful repacking and let me continue.  For my return flight, I upgraded my seat so that the oversized tube assembly had minimal extra cost, receiving a nice meal and celebratory drinks on the return to boot.  With the flights and even car rental, it was cheaper than the shipping estimate from Fedex for either overnight or 2 day (I forget which).  Plus I got to meet the seller to chat about and enjoy audio systems.  When home it all went together without a hitch (we marked the lens cell to tube alignment with painters tape) and I have my "Precious" (think Lord of the Rings - the One Ring).  The added fun was when I picked up the oversized box at the airport baggage area, I realised that airport security had unpacked the tube carton, carefully unwrapped it, checked it, and carefuly wrapped it back up again.  They must have thought it was something .... else.  It took the seller and I about half an hour to wrap and package the tube and case into the cardboard box so it must have taken them about as long, the poor staff.  If it wasn't for their security tape, I wouldn't have known.

<IMG_1201.jpeg>

  

<IMG_1202.jpeg>

  

<Cart.jpg>

 

<IMG_1224.jpeg>

  

<IMG_1315.jpeg>



And to add to the humour, 1yr I think to the month after I acquired Precious, my name came up on the wait list for a new production AP130.  That was a tough decision, but in the end I decided to keep Precious and let someone else enjoy a new AP130.  Last year Precious acquired a sibling when I became the proud owner of a new Stowaway 92 (upgrading from my venerable Grab N Go Vixen ED81) starting me down this finicky road of astro and terrestrial photography with both.  :)  
My first "presentable" picture with the 130:

<M13 Sept 0321.jpg>



Cheers and Keep Safe everyone!
Christopher

PS - thanks to John Mirtle and Rick Keppler for mentoring me.  John has his own AP130EDT so we joke about making a very large pair of binoculars with them, somehow...
PPS - thanks to Daleen and George's at AP, as well as Christine Simpson and Dena Joseph at Starlight for all your patience.  My 130 has a new 2spd focuser w HSM30 and both have a myriad of accessories.  I suspect Daleen has my CC on speed dial...
PPPS - I think my 130EDT belonged to Stuart Heggie at one point.  Thanks Stuart.  :)


 

Jim,

The 130EDTs are very special scopes. I’m glad that you are continuing to enjoy yours.

 

Clear Skies,

Marj Christen

Astro-Physics

11250 Forest Hills Road

Machesney Park, IL 61115

Phone: 815-282-1513

www.astro-physics.com

 

From: main@ap-ug.groups.io <main@ap-ug.groups.io> On Behalf Of thefamily90 Phillips
Sent: Saturday, September 25, 2021 8:47 AM
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-ug] Funny Stories

 

My story isn’t that funny but very memorable to me. Purchased from a Dear Friend, Harvey M who passed away last February.

Are we had been on the list for an AP 130 F/8.35 but did not make the cut. In the meantime, he contacted Tom Back and had a  LZOS 130 F/9.2 made. He only purchased the lens as he made the OTA himself. Then he received an email from AP that they had ended up with an extra AP 130! Did he want it? Well, of course he did. He compared the two telescopes back-and-forth for many years. He never sold anything but, for some reason agree to sell me the AP 130. His conclusion after testing both, side-by-side for years was if they were as near to perfection as any telescope he had ever seen. His AP F/8.35 is number 60, one of the very last ones made. I can confirm that it is a superb telescope.

 

JimP

 

Image.jpegImage.jpeg

 

 


From: main@ap-ug.groups.io <main@ap-ug.groups.io> on behalf of Christopher M <mirfak@...>
Sent: Friday, September 24, 2021 10:30:43 PM
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io <main@ap-ug.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [ap-ug] Funny Stories

 

There is always that bit of fear when doing a big but portable transaction.  I'm glad it worked out well for you.


--
Jim Phillips


M Hambrick
 

I am not sure this falls into the funny category, but some users with portable setups can probably relate to it.

In February 1993 I took delivery of my long anticipated 180EDT and 800 mount. I was very excited to get it, and it exceeded all of my expectations. Naturally, I wanted to show it off, and about a month later I got what I thought would be my first chance to take the scope and mount to my parent's house in Round Rock, Texas. It was "Spring Break" for my 3-year-old daughter's preschool, and my wife had to work that week, so I decided to take my daughter and brand-new telescope to Round Rock and hang out at my parent's house to show off my telescope.

On the day I was planning to leave I assembled all the gear and started loading it into my Ford Explorer while my daughter was playing in the driveway, and watching me load everything. Once all the gear and luggage were loaded, it was time to buckle my daughter's car seat in, get her situated in the car seat, and head out on the 5-hour drive from Orange to Round Rock. There was just one problem. There was absolutely no room left in the Explorer. The rear cargo section was completely full and our luggage completely filled up the front passenger seat.

About this time my daughter began to take more notice. Even though she was only three, she could tell that there was no room for her in the car. She never said anything, but I could see a worried look on her face, probably wondering if I was going to leave her behind. I made the wise choice and unloaded all the astronomy gear, and my daughter and I enjoyed the week at my parent's house without the telescope.

Fast forward 28 years later. My sister-in-law organized a family star party in Wimberley, Texas over Thanksgiving weekend. This time I didn't have to worry about any passengers because my wife was driving separately. Instead of a Ford Explorer I was driving a Honda Pilot, but there was also a lot more gear. This time there was the 180EDT, an 1100GTO mount, 8-inch pier, guide scope, laptop, cameras, cables, binoculars, tools, etc, etc, etc. I got it all loaded into the Pilot, but just barely (see photo), and made the drive without incident.

It has been raining all weekend ! I haven't even bothered to take the gear out of the car.


Pete Lardizabal
 

Priceless!!!

😆

Pete

On Nov 27, 2021, at 10:57 AM, M Hambrick <mhambrick563@...> wrote:

I am not sure this falls into the funny category, but some users with portable setups can probably relate to it.

In February 1993 I took delivery of my long anticipated 180EDT and 800 mount. I was very excited to get it, and it exceeded all of my expectations. Naturally, I wanted to show it off, and about a month later I got what I thought would be my first chance to take the scope and mount to my parent's house in Round Rock, Texas. It was "Spring Break" for my 3-year-old daughter's preschool, and my wife had to work that week, so I decided to take my daughter and brand-new telescope to Round Rock and hang out at my parent's house to show off my telescope.

On the day I was planning to leave I assembled all the gear and started loading it into my Ford Explorer while my daughter was playing in the driveway, and watching me load everything. Once all the gear and luggage were loaded, it was time to buckle my daughter's car seat in, get her situated in the car seat, and head out on the 5-hour drive from Orange to Round Rock. There was just one problem. There was absolutely no room left in the Explorer. The rear cargo section was completely full and our luggage completely filled up the front passenger seat.

About this time my daughter began to take more notice. Even though she was only three, she could tell that there was no room for her in the car. She never said anything, but I could see a worried look on her face, probably wondering if I was going to leave her behind. I made the wise choice and unloaded all the astronomy gear, and my daughter and I enjoyed the week at my parent's house without the telescope.

Fast forward 28 years later. My sister-in-law organized a family star party in Wimberley, Texas over Thanksgiving weekend. This time I didn't have to worry about any passengers because my wife was driving separately. Instead of a Ford Explorer I was driving a Honda Pilot, but there was also a lot more gear. This time there was the 180EDT, an 1100GTO mount, 8-inch pier, guide scope, laptop, cameras, cables, binoculars, tools, etc, etc, etc. I got it all loaded into the Pilot, but just barely (see photo), and made the drive without incident.

It has been raining all weekend ! I haven't even bothered to take the gear out of the car.


John Kutney
 

Lots of room left in the Pilot. Need to add batteries, solar panels, and camping equipment, and food to the load. There is also room on the roof.

On Saturday, November 27, 2021, 11:19:47 AM MST, Pete Lardizabal <p14@...> wrote:


Priceless!!!

😆

Pete

On Nov 27, 2021, at 10:57 AM, M Hambrick <mhambrick563@...> wrote:

I am not sure this falls into the funny category, but some users with portable setups can probably relate to it.

In February 1993 I took delivery of my long anticipated 180EDT and 800 mount. I was very excited to get it, and it exceeded all of my expectations. Naturally, I wanted to show it off, and about a month later I got what I thought would be my first chance to take the scope and mount to my parent's house in Round Rock, Texas. It was "Spring Break" for my 3-year-old daughter's preschool, and my wife had to work that week, so I decided to take my daughter and brand-new telescope to Round Rock and hang out at my parent's house to show off my telescope.

On the day I was planning to leave I assembled all the gear and started loading it into my Ford Explorer while my daughter was playing in the driveway, and watching me load everything. Once all the gear and luggage were loaded, it was time to buckle my daughter's car seat in, get her situated in the car seat, and head out on the 5-hour drive from Orange to Round Rock. There was just one problem. There was absolutely no room left in the Explorer. The rear cargo section was completely full and our luggage completely filled up the front passenger seat.

About this time my daughter began to take more notice. Even though she was only three, she could tell that there was no room for her in the car. She never said anything, but I could see a worried look on her face, probably wondering if I was going to leave her behind. I made the wise choice and unloaded all the astronomy gear, and my daughter and I enjoyed the week at my parent's house without the telescope.

Fast forward 28 years later. My sister-in-law organized a family star party in Wimberley, Texas over Thanksgiving weekend. This time I didn't have to worry about any passengers because my wife was driving separately. Instead of a Ford Explorer I was driving a Honda Pilot, but there was also a lot more gear. This time there was the 180EDT, an 1100GTO mount, 8-inch pier, guide scope, laptop, cameras, cables, binoculars, tools, etc, etc, etc. I got it all loaded into the Pilot, but just barely (see photo), and made the drive without incident.

It has been raining all weekend ! I haven't even bothered to take the gear out of the car.


ROBERT WYNNE
 

Oh no. -Best, Robert

On 11/27/2021 10:19 AM Pete Lardizabal <p14@...> wrote:



Priceless!!!

😆

Pete

On Nov 27, 2021, at 10:57 AM, M Hambrick <mhambrick563@...> wrote:

I am not sure this falls into the funny category, but some users with portable setups can probably relate to it.

In February 1993 I took delivery of my long anticipated 180EDT and 800 mount. I was very excited to get it, and it exceeded all of my expectations. Naturally, I wanted to show it off, and about a month later I got what I thought would be my first chance to take the scope and mount to my parent's house in Round Rock, Texas. It was "Spring Break" for my 3-year-old daughter's preschool, and my wife had to work that week, so I decided to take my daughter and brand-new telescope to Round Rock and hang out at my parent's house to show off my telescope.

On the day I was planning to leave I assembled all the gear and started loading it into my Ford Explorer while my daughter was playing in the driveway, and watching me load everything. Once all the gear and luggage were loaded, it was time to buckle my daughter's car seat in, get her situated in the car seat, and head out on the 5-hour drive from Orange to Round Rock. There was just one problem. There was absolutely no room left in the Explorer. The rear cargo section was completely full and our luggage completely filled up the front passenger seat.

About this time my daughter began to take more notice. Even though she was only three, she could tell that there was no room for her in the car. She never said anything, but I could see a worried look on her face, probably wondering if I was going to leave her behind. I made the wise choice and unloaded all the astronomy gear, and my daughter and I enjoyed the week at my parent's house without the telescope.

Fast forward 28 years later. My sister-in-law organized a family star party in Wimberley, Texas over Thanksgiving weekend. This time I didn't have to worry about any passengers because my wife was driving separately. Instead of a Ford Explorer I was driving a Honda Pilot, but there was also a lot more gear. This time there was the 180EDT, an 1100GTO mount, 8-inch pier, guide scope, laptop, cameras, cables, binoculars, tools, etc, etc, etc. I got it all loaded into the Pilot, but just barely (see photo), and made the drive without incident.

It has been raining all weekend ! I haven't even bothered to take the gear out of the car.


Jay Freeman
 

Not particularly about AP products, but perhaps entertaining ...

http://www.jayreynoldsfreeman.com/Aux/AstroPDFs/TTGBITN.text.pdf

http://www.jayreynoldsfreeman.com/Aux/AstroPDFs/Deliver.text.pdf

And you imagers may be amused by a few recollections of an evening lecture at the late, lamented Riverside Telescope Makers' Convention, some time about 1980. The topic was avoiding errors in photographic imaging of deep-sky objects, using a technology left over from before the Cretaceous / Tertiary asteroid strike, featuring something called "film".

Slides were projected. I particularly remember one called "The Blank Frame", which was further explained as a 1/125-th second exposure of M31, followed by 45 minutes of careful hand-guiding. Another was "The Mark Of Zorro", and there were several variants here, depending on whether it was the family cat or dog that had rubbed up against the tripod leg. And I think there was a completely transparent slide which was the result of a nice exposure of M13 after which the telescope operator had fallen asleep until shortly after sunrise.

Anyway, clear sky to you all ...

-- Jay Reynolds Freeman, Deep-Sky Weasel
---------------------
Jay_Reynolds_Freeman@mac.com
http://JayReynoldsFreeman.com (personal web site)


Pete Lardizabal
 

🤣🤣🤣

🤗

Pete

On Nov 28, 2021, at 3:08 AM, Jay Freeman via groups.io <Jay_Reynolds_Freeman=mac.com@groups.io> wrote:

Not particularly about AP products, but perhaps entertaining ...

http://www.jayreynoldsfreeman.com/Aux/AstroPDFs/TTGBITN.text.pdf

http://www.jayreynoldsfreeman.com/Aux/AstroPDFs/Deliver.text.pdf

And you imagers may be amused by a few recollections of an evening lecture at the late, lamented Riverside Telescope Makers' Convention, some time about 1980. The topic was avoiding errors in photographic imaging of deep-sky objects, using a technology left over from before the Cretaceous / Tertiary asteroid strike, featuring something called "film".

Slides were projected. I particularly remember one called "The Blank Frame", which was further explained as a 1/125-th second exposure of M31, followed by 45 minutes of careful hand-guiding. Another was "The Mark Of Zorro", and there were several variants here, depending on whether it was the family cat or dog that had rubbed up against the tripod leg. And I think there was a completely transparent slide which was the result of a nice exposure of M13 after which the telescope operator had fallen asleep until shortly after sunrise.

Anyway, clear sky to you all ...

-- Jay Reynolds Freeman, Deep-Sky Weasel
---------------------
Jay_Reynolds_Freeman@mac.com
http://JayReynoldsFreeman.com (personal web site)






Roland Christen
 

Great stories.

I too have critters that accompany me in the AP observatory. Besides the mice and chipmunks who like to climb up the inside of the telescope piers, I have a bunch of coyotes in the field behind the observatory. Whenever there is an ambulance or police car with sirens on the nearby highway the coyotes will howl and yip along with them. I have howled along with them, but they don't seem impressed with my songs.

One day I was working inside my observatory when I was startled by a loud bang on the roof. I checked outside but saw nothing. A minute later there was another bang followed by another. I rushed outside and saw a big crow at the peak of the roof dropping a fairly large stone onto the roof and was watching it roll down the steel panels, and obviously quite amused.

Rolando

-----Original Message-----
From: Jay Freeman via groups.io <Jay_Reynolds_Freeman@...>
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Cc: Jay Freeman <jay_reynolds_freeman@...>
Sent: Sun, Nov 28, 2021 2:08 am
Subject: Re: [ap-ug] Funny Stories

Not particularly about AP products, but perhaps entertaining ...

http://www.jayreynoldsfreeman.com/Aux/AstroPDFs/TTGBITN.text.pdf

http://www.jayreynoldsfreeman.com/Aux/AstroPDFs/Deliver.text.pdf

And you imagers may be amused by a few recollections of an evening lecture at the late, lamented Riverside Telescope Makers' Convention, some time about 1980. The topic was avoiding errors in photographic imaging of deep-sky objects, using a technology left over from before the Cretaceous / Tertiary asteroid strike, featuring something called "film".

Slides were projected. I particularly remember one called "The Blank Frame", which was further explained as a 1/125-th second exposure of M31, followed by 45 minutes of careful hand-guiding. Another was "The Mark Of Zorro", and there were several variants here, depending on whether it was the family cat or dog that had rubbed up against the tripod leg. And I think there was a completely transparent slide which was the result of a nice exposure of M13 after which the telescope operator had fallen asleep until shortly after sunrise.

Anyway, clear sky to you all ...

--  Jay Reynolds Freeman, Deep-Sky Weasel
---------------------
Jay_Reynolds_Freeman@...
http://JayReynoldsFreeman.com (personal web site)







Stuart
 

Great story Rolando! I will share one I "might" have shared long ago:

Doing a manually guided shot on film, my cats are outside with me. My tabby is under the tripod bumping into me and everything else so I shoo her away, finish the shot then look up to see that she's a few feet away eating an apple on the ground. I get up, go over to pick her up and take her into the house. I then mentally comment "Odd, her white markings are on her chest not her back. Whoa!!" I literally had my hands a few inches from the skunk's body to pick it up when I realized who had been bumping around under my tripod and through my legs!


On Sun, 28 Nov 2021 at 12:04, Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Great stories.

I too have critters that accompany me in the AP observatory. Besides the mice and chipmunks who like to climb up the inside of the telescope piers, I have a bunch of coyotes in the field behind the observatory. Whenever there is an ambulance or police car with sirens on the nearby highway the coyotes will howl and yip along with them. I have howled along with them, but they don't seem impressed with my songs.

One day I was working inside my observatory when I was startled by a loud bang on the roof. I checked outside but saw nothing. A minute later there was another bang followed by another. I rushed outside and saw a big crow at the peak of the roof dropping a fairly large stone onto the roof and was watching it roll down the steel panels, and obviously quite amused.

Rolando

-----Original Message-----
From: Jay Freeman via groups.io <Jay_Reynolds_Freeman=mac.com@groups.io>
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Cc: Jay Freeman <jay_reynolds_freeman@...>
Sent: Sun, Nov 28, 2021 2:08 am
Subject: Re: [ap-ug] Funny Stories

Not particularly about AP products, but perhaps entertaining ...

http://www.jayreynoldsfreeman.com/Aux/AstroPDFs/TTGBITN.text.pdf

http://www.jayreynoldsfreeman.com/Aux/AstroPDFs/Deliver.text.pdf

And you imagers may be amused by a few recollections of an evening lecture at the late, lamented Riverside Telescope Makers' Convention, some time about 1980. The topic was avoiding errors in photographic imaging of deep-sky objects, using a technology left over from before the Cretaceous / Tertiary asteroid strike, featuring something called "film".

Slides were projected. I particularly remember one called "The Blank Frame", which was further explained as a 1/125-th second exposure of M31, followed by 45 minutes of careful hand-guiding. Another was "The Mark Of Zorro", and there were several variants here, depending on whether it was the family cat or dog that had rubbed up against the tripod leg. And I think there was a completely transparent slide which was the result of a nice exposure of M13 after which the telescope operator had fallen asleep until shortly after sunrise.

Anyway, clear sky to you all ...

--  Jay Reynolds Freeman, Deep-Sky Weasel
---------------------
Jay_Reynolds_Freeman@...
http://JayReynoldsFreeman.com (personal web site)







Roland Christen
 

Stuck out tongue closed eyes Great story!

Rolando

-----Original Message-----
From: Stuart <stuart.j.heggie@...>
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Sent: Sun, Nov 28, 2021 11:59 am
Subject: Re: [ap-ug] Funny Stories

Great story Rolando! I will share one I "might" have shared long ago:

Doing a manually guided shot on film, my cats are outside with me. My tabby is under the tripod bumping into me and everything else so I shoo her away, finish the shot then look up to see that she's a few feet away eating an apple on the ground. I get up, go over to pick her up and take her into the house. I then mentally comment "Odd, her white markings are on her chest not her back. Whoa!!" I literally had my hands a few inches from the skunk's body to pick it up when I realized who had been bumping around under my tripod and through my legs!


On Sun, 28 Nov 2021 at 12:04, Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Great stories.

I too have critters that accompany me in the AP observatory. Besides the mice and chipmunks who like to climb up the inside of the telescope piers, I have a bunch of coyotes in the field behind the observatory. Whenever there is an ambulance or police car with sirens on the nearby highway the coyotes will howl and yip along with them. I have howled along with them, but they don't seem impressed with my songs.

One day I was working inside my observatory when I was startled by a loud bang on the roof. I checked outside but saw nothing. A minute later there was another bang followed by another. I rushed outside and saw a big crow at the peak of the roof dropping a fairly large stone onto the roof and was watching it roll down the steel panels, and obviously quite amused.

Rolando

-----Original Message-----
From: Jay Freeman via groups.io <Jay_Reynolds_Freeman=mac.com@groups.io>
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Cc: Jay Freeman <jay_reynolds_freeman@...>
Sent: Sun, Nov 28, 2021 2:08 am
Subject: Re: [ap-ug] Funny Stories

Not particularly about AP products, but perhaps entertaining ...

http://www.jayreynoldsfreeman.com/Aux/AstroPDFs/TTGBITN.text.pdf

http://www.jayreynoldsfreeman.com/Aux/AstroPDFs/Deliver.text.pdf

And you imagers may be amused by a few recollections of an evening lecture at the late, lamented Riverside Telescope Makers' Convention, some time about 1980. The topic was avoiding errors in photographic imaging of deep-sky objects, using a technology left over from before the Cretaceous / Tertiary asteroid strike, featuring something called "film".

Slides were projected. I particularly remember one called "The Blank Frame", which was further explained as a 1/125-th second exposure of M31, followed by 45 minutes of careful hand-guiding. Another was "The Mark Of Zorro", and there were several variants here, depending on whether it was the family cat or dog that had rubbed up against the tripod leg. And I think there was a completely transparent slide which was the result of a nice exposure of M13 after which the telescope operator had fallen asleep until shortly after sunrise.

Anyway, clear sky to you all ...

--  Jay Reynolds Freeman, Deep-Sky Weasel
---------------------
Jay_Reynolds_Freeman@...
http://JayReynoldsFreeman.com (personal web site)