Photo M1 stack third pass crop.jpeg uploaded #photo-notice


main@ap-ug.groups.io Notification <noreply@...>
 

The following photos have been uploaded to the JMD Pre ED AP Starfire album of the main@ap-ug.groups.io group.

By: deitzelj


Stuart
 

Looks good! Tough target with pretty much any refractor.


On Tue, 15 Dec 2020 at 09:56, main@ap-ug.groups.io Notification <noreply@groups.io> wrote:

The following photos have been uploaded to the JMD Pre ED AP Starfire album of the main@ap-ug.groups.io group.

By: deitzelj


deitzelj
 

Thank you Stuart!  I appreciate your encouragement.   To be honest, I was just excited to actually SEE it:-).  I have only seen M1  visually once before from our club's dark site in an 8 inch Newt, and it was of course pretty much a fuzz ball.   Never from my back yard.    I learn a little bit more with each target I choose.    I have always been surprised how few examples of imaging with these older scopes can be found on the internet, so  I am kind of keeping the gallery here as a sort of journal of my adventures.  

Cheers!

JMD


ROBERT WYNNE
 

I've been intending to contact you since you first posted regarding your Starfire 127 set up. But reconstructive surgery on my right ankle has intervened with my ability to timely respond . Many thanks for your posts using the Starfires. Until you posted this collection of images I had no idea what my 127 was capable. At this point I can only aspire to obtain your technical prowess and feel fortunate to have acquired a near new 127 a few months ago quite serendipitously, much as if it had fallen out of the sky into my lap. Thanks again for the inspiring imaging. I look to follow in your footsteps as time allows. -Best, Robert 

On 12/15/2020 4:55 PM deitzelj via groups.io <deitzelj@...> wrote:
 
 
Thank you Stuart!  I appreciate your encouragement.   To be honest, I was just excited to actually SEE it:-).  I have only seen M1  visually once before from our club's dark site in an 8 inch Newt, and it was of course pretty much a fuzz ball.   Never from my back yard.    I learn a little bit more with each target I choose.    I have always been surprised how few examples of imaging with these older scopes can be found on the internet, so  I am kind of keeping the gallery here as a sort of journal of my adventures.  

Cheers!

JMD


deitzelj
 
Edited

Hi Robert!  Thanks for the very kind words.   In truth, while I am enjoying myself immensely and I am proud of my images, the reality is that I am very much at the beginning of a very long learning curve:-).  There are MANY folks that post in this group that are FAR more accomplished with this discipline, and it is wonderful how encouraging they are when I post my little post cards from the Universe:-). For truly inspiring examples of what can be achieved in astrophotography generally, take a look at Stuart's website:-).     As far as the 127mm scope goes, I have found it to be quite excellent both for visual as well as my imaging adventures.   In a previous thread, Roland gave a very nice and detailed summary regarding the design of the scope and its capabilities and my experience with it pretty much is dead on with his description of how it should perform.   I think you will be very pleased.  

As a somewhat experienced beginner in astro imaging, my counsel would be the following.  Please remember that this really is a discipline and there is a lot to learn.  Depending on how deeply you get into it, Astrophotography to day involves Astronomy, photography, Optics, robotics(mounts), Automation, image/signal processing,  and IT networking among other things.  There are many things that go into taking a nice image, It is very easy to get overwhelmed and frustrated.   The good news is that with advances in the camera sensor technology, it is possible to take some pretty good snapshots of brighter deep space objects with a less complex set up.  I spent a lot of time (8 years or so) just putting a camera on my scopes and taking short duration images with no guiding, and I learned a lot about using the camera, finding targets and basic imagine processing.  A couple of those images are in my gallery.  Eventually, I got the point where I wanted to do more, I upgraded my mount and started to learn to guide(still working on that:-).   Now I am exploring the wonders of plate solving and centering the camera on a target automatically.  It is truly amazing what is available to the amateur astronomer today, but it is a lot to learn.  My advice boils down take small bites of the apple:-)  Start simple, and add complexity to your setup as you get confidence.  And have fun!   Good Luck!  I look forward to seeing your first images with your scope.    Hope that you are feeling better and will be up and around soon!

Cheers!
JMD


 

Very excellent advice!!!

 

Clear Skies,

 

Marj Christen

Astro-Physics, Inc

11250 Forest Hills Rd

Machesney Park, IL 61115

Phone: 815-282-1513

Fax: 815-282-9847

www.astro-physics.com

 

From: main@ap-ug.groups.io [mailto:main@ap-ug.groups.io] On Behalf Of deitzelj via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, December 16, 2020 10:35 AM
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-ug] Photo M1 stack third pass crop.jpeg uploaded #photo-notice

 

[Edited Message Follows]

Hi Robert!  Thanks for the very kind words.   In truth, while I am enjoying myself immensely and I am proud of my images, the reality is that I am very much at the beginning of a very long learning curve:-).  There are MANY folks that post in this group that are FAR more accomplished with this discipline, and it is wonderful how encouraging they are when I post my little post cards from the Universe:-). For truly inspiring examples of what can be achieved in astrophotography generally, take a look at Stuart's website:-).     As far as the 127mm scope goes, I have found it to be quite excellent both for visual as well as my imaging adventures.   In a previous thread, Roland gave a very nice and detailed summary regarding the design of the scope and its capabilities and my experience with it pretty much is dead on with his description of how it should perform.   I think you will be very pleased.  

As a somewhat experienced beginner in astro imaging, my counsel would be the following.  Please remember that this really is a discipline and there is a lot to learn.  Depending on how deeply you get into it, Astrophotography to day involves Astronomy, photography, Optics, robotics(mounts), Automation, image/signal processing,  and IT networking among other things.  There are many things that go into taking a nice image, It is very easy to get overwhelmed and frustrated.   The good news is that with advances in the camera sensor technology, it is possible to take some pretty good snapshots of brighter deep space objects with a less complex set up.  I spent a lot of time (8 years or so) just putting a camera on my scopes and taking short duration images with no guiding, and I learned a lot about using the camera, finding targets and basic imagine processing.  A couple of those images are in my gallery.  Eventually, I got the point where I wanted to do more, I upgraded my mount and started to learn to guide(still working on that:-).   Now I am exploring the wonders of plate solving and centering the camera on a target automatically.  It is truly amazing what is available to the amateur astronomer today, but it is a lot to learn.  My advice boils down take small bites of the apple:-)  Start simple, and add complexity to your setup as you get confidence.  And have fun!   Good Luck!  I look forward to seeing your first images with your scope.    Hope that you are feeling better and will be up and around soon!

Cheers!
JMD


ROBERT WYNNE
 

I whole heartedly agree. I take my place at the bottom of the list on this forum and feel fortunate to be able to watch all discussions. -Best, Robert

On 12/16/2020 12:05 PM Marj Christen <marj@...> wrote:
 
 

Very excellent advice!!!

 

Clear Skies,

 

Marj Christen

Astro-Physics, Inc

11250 Forest Hills Rd

Machesney Park, IL 61115

Phone: 815-282-1513

Fax: 815-282-9847

www.astro-physics.com

 

From: main@ap-ug.groups.io [mailto:main@ap-ug.groups.io] On Behalf Of deitzelj via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, December 16, 2020 10:35 AM
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-ug] Photo M1 stack third pass crop.jpeg uploaded #photo-notice

 

[Edited Message Follows]

Hi Robert!  Thanks for the very kind words.   In truth, while I am enjoying myself immensely and I am proud of my images, the reality is that I am very much at the beginning of a very long learning curve:-).  There are MANY folks that post in this group that are FAR more accomplished with this discipline, and it is wonderful how encouraging they are when I post my little post cards from the Universe:-). For truly inspiring examples of what can be achieved in astrophotography generally, take a look at Stuart's website:-).     As far as the 127mm scope goes, I have found it to be quite excellent both for visual as well as my imaging adventures.   In a previous thread, Roland gave a very nice and detailed summary regarding the design of the scope and its capabilities and my experience with it pretty much is dead on with his description of how it should perform.   I think you will be very pleased.  

As a somewhat experienced beginner in astro imaging, my counsel would be the following.  Please remember that this really is a discipline and there is a lot to learn.  Depending on how deeply you get into it, Astrophotography to day involves Astronomy, photography, Optics, robotics(mounts), Automation, image/signal processing,  and IT networking among other things.  There are many things that go into taking a nice image, It is very easy to get overwhelmed and frustrated.   The good news is that with advances in the camera sensor technology, it is possible to take some pretty good snapshots of brighter deep space objects with a less complex set up.  I spent a lot of time (8 years or so) just putting a camera on my scopes and taking short duration images with no guiding, and I learned a lot about using the camera, finding targets and basic imagine processing.  A couple of those images are in my gallery.  Eventually, I got the point where I wanted to do more, I upgraded my mount and started to learn to guide(still working on that:-).   Now I am exploring the wonders of plate solving and centering the camera on a target automatically.  It is truly amazing what is available to the amateur astronomer today, but it is a lot to learn.  My advice boils down take small bites of the apple:-)  Start simple, and add complexity to your setup as you get confidence.  And have fun!   Good Luck!  I look forward to seeing your first images with your scope.    Hope that you are feeling better and will be up and around soon!

Cheers!
JMD

 


ROBERT WYNNE
 

BTW is there any chance of obtaining the Roland's article. -Best, Robert

On 12/16/2020 12:05 PM Marj Christen <marj@...> wrote:
 
 

Very excellent advice!!!

 

Clear Skies,

 

Marj Christen

Astro-Physics, Inc

11250 Forest Hills Rd

Machesney Park, IL 61115

Phone: 815-282-1513

Fax: 815-282-9847

www.astro-physics.com

 

From: main@ap-ug.groups.io [mailto:main@ap-ug.groups.io] On Behalf Of deitzelj via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, December 16, 2020 10:35 AM
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-ug] Photo M1 stack third pass crop.jpeg uploaded #photo-notice

 

[Edited Message Follows]

Hi Robert!  Thanks for the very kind words.   In truth, while I am enjoying myself immensely and I am proud of my images, the reality is that I am very much at the beginning of a very long learning curve:-).  There are MANY folks that post in this group that are FAR more accomplished with this discipline, and it is wonderful how encouraging they are when I post my little post cards from the Universe:-). For truly inspiring examples of what can be achieved in astrophotography generally, take a look at Stuart's website:-).     As far as the 127mm scope goes, I have found it to be quite excellent both for visual as well as my imaging adventures.   In a previous thread, Roland gave a very nice and detailed summary regarding the design of the scope and its capabilities and my experience with it pretty much is dead on with his description of how it should perform.   I think you will be very pleased.  

As a somewhat experienced beginner in astro imaging, my counsel would be the following.  Please remember that this really is a discipline and there is a lot to learn.  Depending on how deeply you get into it, Astrophotography to day involves Astronomy, photography, Optics, robotics(mounts), Automation, image/signal processing,  and IT networking among other things.  There are many things that go into taking a nice image, It is very easy to get overwhelmed and frustrated.   The good news is that with advances in the camera sensor technology, it is possible to take some pretty good snapshots of brighter deep space objects with a less complex set up.  I spent a lot of time (8 years or so) just putting a camera on my scopes and taking short duration images with no guiding, and I learned a lot about using the camera, finding targets and basic imagine processing.  A couple of those images are in my gallery.  Eventually, I got the point where I wanted to do more, I upgraded my mount and started to learn to guide(still working on that:-).   Now I am exploring the wonders of plate solving and centering the camera on a target automatically.  It is truly amazing what is available to the amateur astronomer today, but it is a lot to learn.  My advice boils down take small bites of the apple:-)  Start simple, and add complexity to your setup as you get confidence.  And have fun!   Good Luck!  I look forward to seeing your first images with your scope.    Hope that you are feeling better and will be up and around soon!

Cheers!
JMD

 


deitzelj
 

Hi Robert!
      I was referring to Roland's response to one of your questions in the original 127 Starfire thread I started a couple months ago.  To summarize, if you use a one shot color camera like I do, you will see just a little bit of the effect from CA.  Paraphrasing Roland, If you use Narrowband filters to image, there should be no noticeable difference between our scopes and more modern versions.    Visually, I ONLY see  CA on bright objects like Venus, Sirius and Vega at ~200X or so, and then, just a faint diffuse indigo/blue.  It is almost EXACTLY as described in the contemporary Astro Physics ad from the time.   I remember thinking the first time I looked at Sirius, "Wow, talk about truth in advertising:-)".   As far as imaging goes, I am happy with my results, and there are many, many other factors that I need to work on before I start thinking about going out to get a filter wheel:-).  The thing that strikes me about these scopes both visually and imaging is the sharpness of fine detail and contrast between light and dark areas.  I think you are in for loads of fun:-)!  

Cheers!

JMD


ROBERT WYNNE
 

JMD
 
Thanks for the clarification.
 
I think I have pestered everyone on this board for information about this scope beginning with the patient folks at A-P who provided me the original promotional brochure twice and a review by a third party. I have heard there were manuals distributed with these scopes but none has surfaced as of yet. Aside from portability, I can see no great difference in performance among the lines from the late 80's to current refractors.
 
Though the Fluorite coating on the Starfire 5" probably demands some additional care and just may degrade over time. Don't know if a Fluorite coating sublimes by oxidation or another process.  I'm afraid to touch the front objective though cleaning instructions have been provided by George due the degrading foam in the case in which it has been stored virtually untouched for over 30 years - evolving volatiles from the decomposing polyurethane foam.
 
That all said I'm still wondering about the composition of the front lens objective as it seems to have been fabricated in a transition period at A-P - probably proprietary IP.
 
Having been exposed to some metrology over time I find the precision machining on this scope among the best. The 10-32 tapped holes are tapped at 100% threads, 90 degrees to normal and the matching thumbscrew 100% threads -.0001" for a tight fit with no wobble all positioned TDC. I suspect this precision is only exceeded by the lens.
 
Best, Robert

On 12/17/2020 9:07 AM deitzelj via groups.io <deitzelj@...> wrote:
 
 
Hi Robert!
      I was referring to Roland's response to one of your questions in the original 127 Starfire thread I started a couple months ago.  To summarize, if you use a one shot color camera like I do, you will see just a little bit of the effect from CA.  Paraphrasing Roland, If you use Narrowband filters to image, there should be no noticeable difference between our scopes and more modern versions.    Visually, I ONLY see  CA on bright objects like Venus, Sirius and Vega at ~200X or so, and then, just a faint diffuse indigo/blue.  It is almost EXACTLY as described in the contemporary Astro Physics ad from the time.   I remember thinking the first time I looked at Sirius, "Wow, talk about truth in advertising:-)".   As far as imaging goes, I am happy with my results, and there are many, many other factors that I need to work on before I start thinking about going out to get a filter wheel:-).  The thing that strikes me about these scopes both visually and imaging is the sharpness of fine detail and contrast between light and dark areas.  I think you are in for loads of fun:-)!  

Cheers!

JMD