Date   

Re: Funny Stories

Stuart
 

Great story Wade! Okay - I have a coyote story too. We have LOTS of them on and around our farm. One night I'm heading outside to tidy up the yard and our 4 year old grandson gets panicked that the coyotes will get us. I assure him they won't but he can stay in the house while I tidy up if he'd prefer. He's having none of it. Insists I stay inside. Okay, no problem. The next day, he's clearly still obsessed because his mom is coming up to stay that evening and take him back the next day. Realizing she'll arrive around dark, he decides that SHE is at risk from coyotes. Solution: Grampa will go out when she arrives, lure the coyotes away from her so she can safely make it to the house. Apparently, Grampas are expendable if the need is high. LOL!


On Mon, 29 Nov 2021 at 12:28, W Hilmo <y.groups@...> wrote:
I was at OSP one year with a few friends.

There are a few of us who always go up very early, so we get a week or so of extra nights before it starts getting crowded.  This particular year, someone brought their nephew, who grew up in New York City.  He was around 10 to 12 years old, and had never been outside of the city.  It was getting to be dusk and we were sitting in a circle chatting.  Somewhere nearby a pack of coyotes started yipping.

His eyes got really wide and he asked what the noise was.  We told him that it was just coyotes.  He got very concerned and asked if they were going to come and get us.  It took a while to reassure him that it was no big deal and that we'd be fine.

On 11/28/21 10:36 PM, weems@... wrote:

While sitting in an engineering class, I was looking out the window at an old air raid siren on top of an adjacent building.  A large crow landed on the top of the rectangular bell, and set a small stone down on it. The stone rolled down the parabolic curve, and fell to the flat roof. The crow dropped down, got it, went back up and repeated the experiment - at least half a dozen times. Then another crow came and sat on the other end of the horn, while the first crow demonstrated its discovery. The two then had an animated discussion with much shrugging of wings and some beak pointing, before they both flew off. And I thought, “There goes the Isaac Newton of crows.”

More on topic, shortly after I got my 6” f9, I hired a programmer for my research group. We got to talking one day, and discovered that we both had the same scope. Mike Rudenko would go on to discover several comets with his. He was so dedicated to comet hunting that he would wear red eyeglasses to work on any day that was likely to have a good evening for observing, because he said it increased the sensitivity of his eyes. He had memorized every star field in the sky that was visible from his site, and would sweep the whole sky from west to east, checking for anything that had changed.

Chip



Re: Funny Stories

W Hilmo
 

I was at OSP one year with a few friends.

There are a few of us who always go up very early, so we get a week or so of extra nights before it starts getting crowded.  This particular year, someone brought their nephew, who grew up in New York City.  He was around 10 to 12 years old, and had never been outside of the city.  It was getting to be dusk and we were sitting in a circle chatting.  Somewhere nearby a pack of coyotes started yipping.

His eyes got really wide and he asked what the noise was.  We told him that it was just coyotes.  He got very concerned and asked if they were going to come and get us.  It took a while to reassure him that it was no big deal and that we'd be fine.

On 11/28/21 10:36 PM, weems@... wrote:

While sitting in an engineering class, I was looking out the window at an old air raid siren on top of an adjacent building.  A large crow landed on the top of the rectangular bell, and set a small stone down on it. The stone rolled down the parabolic curve, and fell to the flat roof. The crow dropped down, got it, went back up and repeated the experiment - at least half a dozen times. Then another crow came and sat on the other end of the horn, while the first crow demonstrated its discovery. The two then had an animated discussion with much shrugging of wings and some beak pointing, before they both flew off. And I thought, “There goes the Isaac Newton of crows.”

More on topic, shortly after I got my 6” f9, I hired a programmer for my research group. We got to talking one day, and discovered that we both had the same scope. Mike Rudenko would go on to discover several comets with his. He was so dedicated to comet hunting that he would wear red eyeglasses to work on any day that was likely to have a good evening for observing, because he said it increased the sensitivity of his eyes. He had memorized every star field in the sky that was visible from his site, and would sweep the whole sky from west to east, checking for anything that had changed.

Chip



Re: Funny Stories

Roland Christen
 

Hi Chip,

Thanks for bringing back old memories. I remember Mike back when amateurs did comet hunting visually. A very dedicated amateur, among the best there was at the time.

Roland

-----Original Message-----
From: weems@...
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Sent: Mon, Nov 29, 2021 12:36 am
Subject: Re: [ap-ug] Funny Stories

While sitting in an engineering class, I was looking out the window at an old air raid siren on top of an adjacent building.  A large crow landed on the top of the rectangular bell, and set a small stone down on it. The stone rolled down the parabolic curve, and fell to the flat roof. The crow dropped down, got it, went back up and repeated the experiment - at least half a dozen times. Then another crow came and sat on the other end of the horn, while the first crow demonstrated its discovery. The two then had an animated discussion with much shrugging of wings and some beak pointing, before they both flew off. And I thought, “There goes the Isaac Newton of crows.”

More on topic, shortly after I got my 6” f9, I hired a programmer for my research group. We got to talking one day, and discovered that we both had the same scope. Mike Rudenko would go on to discover several comets with his. He was so dedicated to comet hunting that he would wear red eyeglasses to work on any day that was likely to have a good evening for observing, because he said it increased the sensitivity of his eyes. He had memorized every star field in the sky that was visible from his site, and would sweep the whole sky from west to east, checking for anything that had changed.
Chip


Re: Camera Sensor Collimation (with bonus M45 Pleiades)

Bill Long
 

Yep. I'm just curious to hear Brian's experience. 

The through the scope laser method is what I've used. The first run I don't think I had it as well fixed as I do this time. Just waiting on the weather to test again.


From: main@ap-ug.groups.io <main@ap-ug.groups.io> on behalf of Peter Nagy <topboxman@...>
Sent: Sunday, November 28, 2021 10:18 PM
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io <main@ap-ug.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [ap-ug] Camera Sensor Collimation (with bonus M45 Pleiades)
 
On Sun, Nov 28, 2021 at 05:53 PM, ROBERT WYNNE wrote:
Guys keep in mind neither pillow block will arrive in a perfect 90 degree axial alignment. This is due the bearing's self alignment feature that allows up to 15 degrees of off axis installation. -Best, Robert
I agree. That's my experience.

Peter


Re: Funny Stories

weems@...
 

While sitting in an engineering class, I was looking out the window at an old air raid siren on top of an adjacent building.  A large crow landed on the top of the rectangular bell, and set a small stone down on it. The stone rolled down the parabolic curve, and fell to the flat roof. The crow dropped down, got it, went back up and repeated the experiment - at least half a dozen times. Then another crow came and sat on the other end of the horn, while the first crow demonstrated its discovery. The two then had an animated discussion with much shrugging of wings and some beak pointing, before they both flew off. And I thought, “There goes the Isaac Newton of crows.”

More on topic, shortly after I got my 6” f9, I hired a programmer for my research group. We got to talking one day, and discovered that we both had the same scope. Mike Rudenko would go on to discover several comets with his. He was so dedicated to comet hunting that he would wear red eyeglasses to work on any day that was likely to have a good evening for observing, because he said it increased the sensitivity of his eyes. He had memorized every star field in the sky that was visible from his site, and would sweep the whole sky from west to east, checking for anything that had changed.

Chip


Re: Camera Sensor Collimation (with bonus M45 Pleiades)

Peter Nagy
 

On Sun, Nov 28, 2021 at 05:53 PM, ROBERT WYNNE wrote:
Guys keep in mind neither pillow block will arrive in a perfect 90 degree axial alignment. This is due the bearing's self alignment feature that allows up to 15 degrees of off axis installation. -Best, Robert
I agree. That's my experience.

Peter


Re: Camera Sensor Collimation (with bonus M45 Pleiades)

ROBERT WYNNE
 

Guys keep in mind neither pillow block will arrive in a perfect 90 degree axial alignment. This is due the bearing's self alignment feature that allows up to 15 degrees of off axis installation. -Best, Robert

On 11/28/2021 3:17 PM Brian Valente <bvalente@...> wrote:


No laser yet!

i can't believe it, i even ordered a second one, it is not here either



On Sun, Nov 28, 2021 at 1:13 PM Bill Long <bill@...> wrote:
Hey Brian,

Any luck testing with the laser?


From: main@ap-ug.groups.io <main@ap-ug.groups.io> on behalf of Brian Valente <bvalente@...>
Sent: Thursday, November 18, 2021 9:53 PM
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io <main@ap-ug.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [ap-ug] Camera Sensor Collimation (with bonus M45 Pleiades)

>>>  You and peter tried this bearing.  It's Moline's "Heavy Duty" bearing.  They also make a "Standard duty" bearing for about $30.  Any reason you went with heavy duty over standard?  For the cost I'm going to pickup a standard duty bearing to test out. 

I was following Peter's lead on this. The discussion of a bench collimation has been going on for a long time across several different forums, and this particular one seemed well conceived. In my experience it has proven to be solid, at least as far as the absence of wobble is concerned. Once I get the laser i will be able to do the full tests

On Thu, Nov 18, 2021 at 5:48 PM Chris White <chris.white@...> wrote:
On Thu, Nov 18, 2021 at 08:41 PM, Brian Valente wrote:
>>> Do you have a link?  Their website doesnt appear to have an ecommerce section.  Thank you


afaik the whole thing is an ecommerce site

toggle quoted messageShow quoted text



On Thu, Nov 18, 2021 at 3:27 PM Chris White <chris.white@...> wrote:
On Thu, Nov 18, 2021 at 10:41 AM, Brian Valente wrote:
I purchased direct

toggle quoted messageShow quoted text


On Wed, Nov 17, 2021 at 10:17 PM Peter Nagy <topboxman@...> wrote:
Brian,

Did you get Moline bearings from https://www.thebigbearingstore.com 

Or from Amazon.com?

I bought it from Amazon.com. I'm just curious whether Amazon.com gets bad batches roller bearing assemblies.

Peter



--
Brian 
Brian,

Do you have a link?  Their website doesnt appear to have an ecommerce section.  Thank you





--
Brian 
Thanks Brian.  When you said you went direct I thought you meant direct from Moline.

Here is a question.  You and peter tried this bearing.  It's Moline's "Heavy Duty" bearing.  They also make a "Standard duty" bearing for about $30.  Any reason you went with heavy duty over standard?  For the cost I'm going to pickup a standard duty bearing to test out.  Not much to lose on that...

https://www.mrosupply.com/bearings/2490682_19411200_moline-bearing/#product-specification

https://www.mrosupply.com/bearings/2490712_19421200_moline-bearing/





--
Brian 



Brian Valente





--
Brian 



Brian Valente


Re: Funny Stories

Christopher Erickson
 

That was back in the days when film still reigned and CCD dSLR's weren't nearly as sensitive as today's dSLR cams. I can only imagine what I could have done with a Nikon Z6ii back then!

Anyway yes, I did get a whole-lot of aurora pics back then.

"Always take the high road. There's less traffic."

-Christopher Erickson
Observatory Engineer
Summit Kinetics
Waikoloa, Hawaii


Virus-free. www.avg.com


On Sun, Nov 28, 2021 at 3:42 PM ROBERT WYNNE <robert-wynne@...> wrote:
Have you been able to capture a good photo of the aurora. I haven't despite diferent cameras through the film age to the cmos age? The experience is nothing like being there in person. -Best, Robert
On 11/28/2021 12:08 PM Christopher Erickson <christopher.k.erickson@...> wrote:


Back when I lived in Anchorage, Alaska, I was in a situation where the money was great but the skies were total rubbish most of the time. This would lead to a situation where I would accumulate a lot of new but untested astro gear, of course. So on one of those rare nights where the skies were clear and it wasn't during the summer and "The Land of the Midnight Sun", I would rush to set up all kinds of new astro gear to test it out under the rare starry night. I would probably get about 5-10 good nights for astronomy every YEAR. 

So anyway on one of those incredibly rare (and cold) starry winter nights, I rushed out and set up my main scope with a brand-new, one-shot color camera I had purchased about nine months earlier. This was to be its maiden voyage! So anyway I am out there in the frightful cold (about -40C/F) with my astro-laptop, taking and studying images of various astro targets when I notice a green cast to most of my images. So I sat there and struggled with image after image, staring at my bright laptop screen for several hours. I finally needed a bio-break so I put on my red goggles and headed for the house. Mission accomplished, I headed back out. On my way back to my scope and laptop, I took off my red goggles and looked up... and finally observed the beautiful aurora dancing from horizon to horizon. Filled with restless, hissing greens, purples, violets and reds. I sighed, my shoulders dropped. I packed up all my gear and went and got my dSLR and tripod instead.

"Always take the high road. There's less traffic."

-Christopher Erickson
Observatory Engineer
Summit Kinetics
Waikoloa, Hawaii


Virus-free. www.avg.com

On Sat, Nov 27, 2021 at 5:57 AM M Hambrick <mhambrick563@...> wrote:
I am not sure this falls into the funny category, but some users with portable setups can probably relate to it.

In February 1993 I took delivery of my long anticipated 180EDT and 800 mount. I was very excited to get it, and it exceeded all of my expectations. Naturally, I wanted to show it off, and about a month later I got what I thought would be my first chance to take the scope and mount to my parent's house in Round Rock, Texas. It was "Spring Break" for my 3-year-old daughter's preschool, and my wife had to work that week, so I decided to take my daughter and brand-new telescope to Round Rock and hang out at my parent's house to show off my telescope.

On the day I was planning to leave I assembled all the gear and started loading it into my Ford Explorer while my daughter was playing in the driveway, and watching me load everything. Once all the gear and luggage were loaded, it was time to buckle my daughter's car seat in, get her situated in the car seat, and head out on the 5-hour drive from Orange to Round Rock. There was just one problem. There was absolutely no room left in the Explorer. The rear cargo section was completely full and our luggage completely filled up the front passenger seat.

About this time my daughter began to take more notice. Even though she was only three, she could tell that there was no room for her in the car. She never said anything, but I could see a worried look on her face, probably wondering if I was going to leave her behind. I made the wise choice and unloaded all the astronomy gear, and my daughter and I enjoyed the week at my parent's house without the telescope.

Fast forward 28 years later. My sister-in-law organized a family star party in Wimberley, Texas over Thanksgiving weekend. This time I didn't have to worry about any passengers because my wife was driving separately. Instead of a Ford Explorer I was driving a Honda Pilot, but there was also a lot more gear. This time there was the 180EDT, an 1100GTO mount, 8-inch pier, guide scope, laptop, cameras, cables, binoculars, tools, etc, etc, etc. I got it all loaded into the Pilot, but just barely (see photo), and made the drive without incident.

It has been raining all weekend ! I haven't even bothered to take the gear out of the car.




Re: Funny Stories

ROBERT WYNNE
 

Have you been able to capture a good photo of the aurora. I haven't despite diferent cameras through the film age to the cmos age? The experience is nothing like being there in person. -Best, Robert

On 11/28/2021 12:08 PM Christopher Erickson <christopher.k.erickson@...> wrote:


Back when I lived in Anchorage, Alaska, I was in a situation where the money was great but the skies were total rubbish most of the time. This would lead to a situation where I would accumulate a lot of new but untested astro gear, of course. So on one of those rare nights where the skies were clear and it wasn't during the summer and "The Land of the Midnight Sun", I would rush to set up all kinds of new astro gear to test it out under the rare starry night. I would probably get about 5-10 good nights for astronomy every YEAR. 

So anyway on one of those incredibly rare (and cold) starry winter nights, I rushed out and set up my main scope with a brand-new, one-shot color camera I had purchased about nine months earlier. This was to be its maiden voyage! So anyway I am out there in the frightful cold (about -40C/F) with my astro-laptop, taking and studying images of various astro targets when I notice a green cast to most of my images. So I sat there and struggled with image after image, staring at my bright laptop screen for several hours. I finally needed a bio-break so I put on my red goggles and headed for the house. Mission accomplished, I headed back out. On my way back to my scope and laptop, I took off my red goggles and looked up... and finally observed the beautiful aurora dancing from horizon to horizon. Filled with restless, hissing greens, purples, violets and reds. I sighed, my shoulders dropped. I packed up all my gear and went and got my dSLR and tripod instead.

"Always take the high road. There's less traffic."

-Christopher Erickson
Observatory Engineer
Summit Kinetics
Waikoloa, Hawaii


Virus-free. www.avg.com

On Sat, Nov 27, 2021 at 5:57 AM M Hambrick <mhambrick563@...> wrote:
I am not sure this falls into the funny category, but some users with portable setups can probably relate to it.

In February 1993 I took delivery of my long anticipated 180EDT and 800 mount. I was very excited to get it, and it exceeded all of my expectations. Naturally, I wanted to show it off, and about a month later I got what I thought would be my first chance to take the scope and mount to my parent's house in Round Rock, Texas. It was "Spring Break" for my 3-year-old daughter's preschool, and my wife had to work that week, so I decided to take my daughter and brand-new telescope to Round Rock and hang out at my parent's house to show off my telescope.

On the day I was planning to leave I assembled all the gear and started loading it into my Ford Explorer while my daughter was playing in the driveway, and watching me load everything. Once all the gear and luggage were loaded, it was time to buckle my daughter's car seat in, get her situated in the car seat, and head out on the 5-hour drive from Orange to Round Rock. There was just one problem. There was absolutely no room left in the Explorer. The rear cargo section was completely full and our luggage completely filled up the front passenger seat.

About this time my daughter began to take more notice. Even though she was only three, she could tell that there was no room for her in the car. She never said anything, but I could see a worried look on her face, probably wondering if I was going to leave her behind. I made the wise choice and unloaded all the astronomy gear, and my daughter and I enjoyed the week at my parent's house without the telescope.

Fast forward 28 years later. My sister-in-law organized a family star party in Wimberley, Texas over Thanksgiving weekend. This time I didn't have to worry about any passengers because my wife was driving separately. Instead of a Ford Explorer I was driving a Honda Pilot, but there was also a lot more gear. This time there was the 180EDT, an 1100GTO mount, 8-inch pier, guide scope, laptop, cameras, cables, binoculars, tools, etc, etc, etc. I got it all loaded into the Pilot, but just barely (see photo), and made the drive without incident.

It has been raining all weekend ! I haven't even bothered to take the gear out of the car.




Re: Funny Stories

ROBERT WYNNE
 

Ha. -Best, Robert

On 11/28/2021 9:59 AM Stuart <stuart.j.heggie@...> wrote:


Great story Rolando! I will share one I "might" have shared long ago:

Doing a manually guided shot on film, my cats are outside with me. My tabby is under the tripod bumping into me and everything else so I shoo her away, finish the shot then look up to see that she's a few feet away eating an apple on the ground. I get up, go over to pick her up and take her into the house. I then mentally comment "Odd, her white markings are on her chest not her back. Whoa!!" I literally had my hands a few inches from the skunk's body to pick it up when I realized who had been bumping around under my tripod and through my legs!


On Sun, 28 Nov 2021 at 12:04, Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Great stories.

I too have critters that accompany me in the AP observatory. Besides the mice and chipmunks who like to climb up the inside of the telescope piers, I have a bunch of coyotes in the field behind the observatory. Whenever there is an ambulance or police car with sirens on the nearby highway the coyotes will howl and yip along with them. I have howled along with them, but they don't seem impressed with my songs.

One day I was working inside my observatory when I was startled by a loud bang on the roof. I checked outside but saw nothing. A minute later there was another bang followed by another. I rushed outside and saw a big crow at the peak of the roof dropping a fairly large stone onto the roof and was watching it roll down the steel panels, and obviously quite amused.

Rolando

-----Original Message-----
From: Jay Freeman via groups.io <Jay_Reynolds_Freeman=mac.com@groups.io>
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Cc: Jay Freeman <jay_reynolds_freeman@...>
Sent: Sun, Nov 28, 2021 2:08 am
Subject: Re: [ap-ug] Funny Stories

Not particularly about AP products, but perhaps entertaining ...

http://www.jayreynoldsfreeman.com/Aux/AstroPDFs/TTGBITN.text.pdf

http://www.jayreynoldsfreeman.com/Aux/AstroPDFs/Deliver.text.pdf

And you imagers may be amused by a few recollections of an evening lecture at the late, lamented Riverside Telescope Makers' Convention, some time about 1980. The topic was avoiding errors in photographic imaging of deep-sky objects, using a technology left over from before the Cretaceous / Tertiary asteroid strike, featuring something called "film".

Slides were projected. I particularly remember one called "The Blank Frame", which was further explained as a 1/125-th second exposure of M31, followed by 45 minutes of careful hand-guiding. Another was "The Mark Of Zorro", and there were several variants here, depending on whether it was the family cat or dog that had rubbed up against the tripod leg. And I think there was a completely transparent slide which was the result of a nice exposure of M13 after which the telescope operator had fallen asleep until shortly after sunrise.

Anyway, clear sky to you all ...

--  Jay Reynolds Freeman, Deep-Sky Weasel
---------------------
Jay_Reynolds_Freeman@...
http://JayReynoldsFreeman.com (personal web site)









Re: Funny Stories

ROBERT WYNNE
 

He may need a cargo master for loading and unloading. -Best, Robert

On 11/28/2021 11:15 AM Marj Christen <marj@...> wrote:


Very humorous. Thank you for sharing. 😊


Clear Skies,

Marj Christen

Astro-Physics

11250 Forest Hills Road

Machesney Park, IL 61115

Phone: 815-282-1513

www.astro-physics.com


From: main@ap-ug.groups.io <main@ap-ug.groups.io> On Behalf Of M Hambrick
Sent: Saturday, November 27, 2021 9:58 AM
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-ug] Funny Stories


I am not sure this falls into the funny category, but some users with portable setups can probably relate to it.

In February 1993 I took delivery of my long anticipated 180EDT and 800 mount. I was very excited to get it, and it exceeded all of my expectations. Naturally, I wanted to show it off, and about a month later I got what I thought would be my first chance to take the scope and mount to my parent's house in Round Rock, Texas. It was "Spring Break" for my 3-year-old daughter's preschool, and my wife had to work that week, so I decided to take my daughter and brand-new telescope to Round Rock and hang out at my parent's house to show off my telescope.

On the day I was planning to leave I assembled all the gear and started loading it into my Ford Explorer while my daughter was playing in the driveway, and watching me load everything. Once all the gear and luggage were loaded, it was time to buckle my daughter's car seat in, get her situated in the car seat, and head out on the 5-hour drive from Orange to Round Rock. There was just one problem. There was absolutely no room left in the Explorer. The rear cargo section was completely full and our luggage completely filled up the front passenger seat.

About this time my daughter began to take more notice. Even though she was only three, she could tell that there was no room for her in the car. She never said anything, but I could see a worried look on her face, probably wondering if I was going to leave her behind. I made the wise choice and unloaded all the astronomy gear, and my daughter and I enjoyed the week at my parent's house without the telescope.

Fast forward 28 years later. My sister-in-law organized a family star party in Wimberley, Texas over Thanksgiving weekend. This time I didn't have to worry about any passengers because my wife was driving separately. Instead of a Ford Explorer I was driving a Honda Pilot, but there was also a lot more gear. This time there was the 180EDT, an 1100GTO mount, 8-inch pier, guide scope, laptop, cameras, cables, binoculars, tools, etc, etc, etc. I got it all loaded into the Pilot, but just barely (see photo), and made the drive without incident.

It has been raining all weekend ! I haven't even bothered to take the gear out of the car.



Re: Camera Sensor Collimation (with bonus M45 Pleiades)

 

No laser yet!

i can't believe it, i even ordered a second one, it is not here either



On Sun, Nov 28, 2021 at 1:13 PM Bill Long <bill@...> wrote:
Hey Brian,

Any luck testing with the laser?


From: main@ap-ug.groups.io <main@ap-ug.groups.io> on behalf of Brian Valente <bvalente@...>
Sent: Thursday, November 18, 2021 9:53 PM
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io <main@ap-ug.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [ap-ug] Camera Sensor Collimation (with bonus M45 Pleiades)
 
>>>  You and peter tried this bearing.  It's Moline's "Heavy Duty" bearing.  They also make a "Standard duty" bearing for about $30.  Any reason you went with heavy duty over standard?  For the cost I'm going to pickup a standard duty bearing to test out. 

I was following Peter's lead on this. The discussion of a bench collimation has been going on for a long time across several different forums, and this particular one seemed well conceived. In my experience it has proven to be solid, at least as far as the absence of wobble is concerned. Once I get the laser i will be able to do the full tests

On Thu, Nov 18, 2021 at 5:48 PM Chris White <chris.white@...> wrote:
On Thu, Nov 18, 2021 at 08:41 PM, Brian Valente wrote:
>>> Do you have a link?  Their website doesnt appear to have an ecommerce section.  Thank you
 
 
afaik the whole thing is an ecommerce site
 
toggle quoted messageShow quoted text

 


On Thu, Nov 18, 2021 at 3:27 PM Chris White <chris.white@...> wrote:
On Thu, Nov 18, 2021 at 10:41 AM, Brian Valente wrote:
I purchased direct
 
toggle quoted messageShow quoted text

 

On Wed, Nov 17, 2021 at 10:17 PM Peter Nagy <topboxman@...> wrote:
Brian,

Did you get Moline bearings from https://www.thebigbearingstore.com 

Or from Amazon.com?

I bought it from Amazon.com. I'm just curious whether Amazon.com gets bad batches roller bearing assemblies.

Peter

 

 

--
Brian 
Brian,

Do you have a link?  Their website doesnt appear to have an ecommerce section.  Thank you

 

 


 
--
Brian 
Thanks Brian.  When you said you went direct I thought you meant direct from Moline.

Here is a question.  You and peter tried this bearing.  It's Moline's "Heavy Duty" bearing.  They also make a "Standard duty" bearing for about $30.  Any reason you went with heavy duty over standard?  For the cost I'm going to pickup a standard duty bearing to test out.  Not much to lose on that...

https://www.mrosupply.com/bearings/2490682_19411200_moline-bearing/#product-specification

https://www.mrosupply.com/bearings/2490712_19421200_moline-bearing/



--
Brian 



Brian Valente



--
Brian 



Brian Valente


Re: Funny Stories

Jay Freeman
 

Not astronomy at all, but Mike C's  comment reminds me of a time forty years ago when my cat Pixie was sitting on top of an old-style indestructible-plastic rotary-dial official-issue bright-red Bell-system telephone when it rang.

He made it nearly all the way to the ceiling.

-- Jay Reynolds Freeman
---------------------
Jay_Reynolds_Freeman@...
http://JayReynoldsFreeman.com
(personal web site)

On Nov 28, 2021, at 2:09 PM, Mike C <mike@...> wrote:

I remember a night quietly observing Jupiter for a couple hours from my front deck [...]


Re: Funny Stories

Mike C
 


I remember a night quietly observing Jupiter for a couple hours from my front deck.  Quite often when observing, I could hear moose munching in the willow trees that line our property. This night though was dead quiet in the early AM hours. I must have been really running silent based on what happened.  

A neighbors German Shepard was free and nosing around our property.  I didn't hear him and he didn't hear me. We had a few dogs, so I suspect he was sniffing around everything. He eventually worked his search pattern over to me and my G11 with mounted TMB152. I was sitting down low in an observing chair. He was as close as my feet when, at the very same moment, we learned about each other.

With a yelp, he actually went ballistic, the dog went straight up into the air -- all four paws. It was a move so strange looking that it took me a few seconds to even parse what the animal was. While it was still  a "UFO" though, fight or flight had kicked in for me too, for which a low observing chair doesn't lend you much grace. I did a gimpy side roll out of the chair into the snow piled by the deck.



Re: Camera Sensor Collimation (with bonus M45 Pleiades)

Bill Long
 

Hey Brian,

Any luck testing with the laser?


From: main@ap-ug.groups.io <main@ap-ug.groups.io> on behalf of Brian Valente <bvalente@...>
Sent: Thursday, November 18, 2021 9:53 PM
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io <main@ap-ug.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [ap-ug] Camera Sensor Collimation (with bonus M45 Pleiades)
 
>>>  You and peter tried this bearing.  It's Moline's "Heavy Duty" bearing.  They also make a "Standard duty" bearing for about $30.  Any reason you went with heavy duty over standard?  For the cost I'm going to pickup a standard duty bearing to test out. 

I was following Peter's lead on this. The discussion of a bench collimation has been going on for a long time across several different forums, and this particular one seemed well conceived. In my experience it has proven to be solid, at least as far as the absence of wobble is concerned. Once I get the laser i will be able to do the full tests

On Thu, Nov 18, 2021 at 5:48 PM Chris White <chris.white@...> wrote:
On Thu, Nov 18, 2021 at 08:41 PM, Brian Valente wrote:
>>> Do you have a link?  Their website doesnt appear to have an ecommerce section.  Thank you
 
 
afaik the whole thing is an ecommerce site
 
toggle quoted messageShow quoted text

 


On Thu, Nov 18, 2021 at 3:27 PM Chris White <chris.white@...> wrote:
On Thu, Nov 18, 2021 at 10:41 AM, Brian Valente wrote:
I purchased direct
 
toggle quoted messageShow quoted text

 

On Wed, Nov 17, 2021 at 10:17 PM Peter Nagy <topboxman@...> wrote:
Brian,

Did you get Moline bearings from https://www.thebigbearingstore.com 

Or from Amazon.com?

I bought it from Amazon.com. I'm just curious whether Amazon.com gets bad batches roller bearing assemblies.

Peter

 

 

--
Brian 
Brian,

Do you have a link?  Their website doesnt appear to have an ecommerce section.  Thank you

 

 


 
--
Brian 
Thanks Brian.  When you said you went direct I thought you meant direct from Moline.

Here is a question.  You and peter tried this bearing.  It's Moline's "Heavy Duty" bearing.  They also make a "Standard duty" bearing for about $30.  Any reason you went with heavy duty over standard?  For the cost I'm going to pickup a standard duty bearing to test out.  Not much to lose on that...

https://www.mrosupply.com/bearings/2490682_19411200_moline-bearing/#product-specification

https://www.mrosupply.com/bearings/2490712_19421200_moline-bearing/



--
Brian 



Brian Valente


Re: Funny Stories

Christopher Erickson
 

Back when I lived in Anchorage, Alaska, I was in a situation where the money was great but the skies were total rubbish most of the time. This would lead to a situation where I would accumulate a lot of new but untested astro gear, of course. So on one of those rare nights where the skies were clear and it wasn't during the summer and "The Land of the Midnight Sun", I would rush to set up all kinds of new astro gear to test it out under the rare starry night. I would probably get about 5-10 good nights for astronomy every YEAR. 

So anyway on one of those incredibly rare (and cold) starry winter nights, I rushed out and set up my main scope with a brand-new, one-shot color camera I had purchased about nine months earlier. This was to be its maiden voyage! So anyway I am out there in the frightful cold (about -40C/F) with my astro-laptop, taking and studying images of various astro targets when I notice a green cast to most of my images. So I sat there and struggled with image after image, staring at my bright laptop screen for several hours. I finally needed a bio-break so I put on my red goggles and headed for the house. Mission accomplished, I headed back out. On my way back to my scope and laptop, I took off my red goggles and looked up... and finally observed the beautiful aurora dancing from horizon to horizon. Filled with restless, hissing greens, purples, violets and reds. I sighed, my shoulders dropped. I packed up all my gear and went and got my dSLR and tripod instead.

"Always take the high road. There's less traffic."

-Christopher Erickson
Observatory Engineer
Summit Kinetics
Waikoloa, Hawaii


Virus-free. www.avg.com


On Sat, Nov 27, 2021 at 5:57 AM M Hambrick <mhambrick563@...> wrote:
I am not sure this falls into the funny category, but some users with portable setups can probably relate to it.

In February 1993 I took delivery of my long anticipated 180EDT and 800 mount. I was very excited to get it, and it exceeded all of my expectations. Naturally, I wanted to show it off, and about a month later I got what I thought would be my first chance to take the scope and mount to my parent's house in Round Rock, Texas. It was "Spring Break" for my 3-year-old daughter's preschool, and my wife had to work that week, so I decided to take my daughter and brand-new telescope to Round Rock and hang out at my parent's house to show off my telescope.

On the day I was planning to leave I assembled all the gear and started loading it into my Ford Explorer while my daughter was playing in the driveway, and watching me load everything. Once all the gear and luggage were loaded, it was time to buckle my daughter's car seat in, get her situated in the car seat, and head out on the 5-hour drive from Orange to Round Rock. There was just one problem. There was absolutely no room left in the Explorer. The rear cargo section was completely full and our luggage completely filled up the front passenger seat.

About this time my daughter began to take more notice. Even though she was only three, she could tell that there was no room for her in the car. She never said anything, but I could see a worried look on her face, probably wondering if I was going to leave her behind. I made the wise choice and unloaded all the astronomy gear, and my daughter and I enjoyed the week at my parent's house without the telescope.

Fast forward 28 years later. My sister-in-law organized a family star party in Wimberley, Texas over Thanksgiving weekend. This time I didn't have to worry about any passengers because my wife was driving separately. Instead of a Ford Explorer I was driving a Honda Pilot, but there was also a lot more gear. This time there was the 180EDT, an 1100GTO mount, 8-inch pier, guide scope, laptop, cameras, cables, binoculars, tools, etc, etc, etc. I got it all loaded into the Pilot, but just barely (see photo), and made the drive without incident.

It has been raining all weekend ! I haven't even bothered to take the gear out of the car.


Re: Funny Stories

 

Very humorous. Thank you for sharing. 😊

 

Clear Skies,

Marj Christen

Astro-Physics

11250 Forest Hills Road

Machesney Park, IL 61115

Phone: 815-282-1513

www.astro-physics.com

 

From: main@ap-ug.groups.io <main@ap-ug.groups.io> On Behalf Of M Hambrick
Sent: Saturday, November 27, 2021 9:58 AM
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-ug] Funny Stories

 

I am not sure this falls into the funny category, but some users with portable setups can probably relate to it.

In February 1993 I took delivery of my long anticipated 180EDT and 800 mount. I was very excited to get it, and it exceeded all of my expectations. Naturally, I wanted to show it off, and about a month later I got what I thought would be my first chance to take the scope and mount to my parent's house in Round Rock, Texas. It was "Spring Break" for my 3-year-old daughter's preschool, and my wife had to work that week, so I decided to take my daughter and brand-new telescope to Round Rock and hang out at my parent's house to show off my telescope.

On the day I was planning to leave I assembled all the gear and started loading it into my Ford Explorer while my daughter was playing in the driveway, and watching me load everything. Once all the gear and luggage were loaded, it was time to buckle my daughter's car seat in, get her situated in the car seat, and head out on the 5-hour drive from Orange to Round Rock. There was just one problem. There was absolutely no room left in the Explorer. The rear cargo section was completely full and our luggage completely filled up the front passenger seat.

About this time my daughter began to take more notice. Even though she was only three, she could tell that there was no room for her in the car. She never said anything, but I could see a worried look on her face, probably wondering if I was going to leave her behind. I made the wise choice and unloaded all the astronomy gear, and my daughter and I enjoyed the week at my parent's house without the telescope.

Fast forward 28 years later. My sister-in-law organized a family star party in Wimberley, Texas over Thanksgiving weekend. This time I didn't have to worry about any passengers because my wife was driving separately. Instead of a Ford Explorer I was driving a Honda Pilot, but there was also a lot more gear. This time there was the 180EDT, an 1100GTO mount, 8-inch pier, guide scope, laptop, cameras, cables, binoculars, tools, etc, etc, etc. I got it all loaded into the Pilot, but just barely (see photo), and made the drive without incident.

It has been raining all weekend ! I haven't even bothered to take the gear out of the car.


Re: Funny Stories

Chris Cook
 

Good stories.  I have a few from my California days.  One morning in Anza-Borrego State Park, while dozing in my tent after a long night of imaging, a group of guys walked by our campsite shooting their weapons.  Not sure what they were shooting at.  Let's just say it woke me up.  Another time, again in Anza-Borrego, I was camped out with our group., which consisted of four guys, were cooking breakfast around 9am.  All of the sudden a guy riding his mountain bike completely naked pulls up into our campsite asking what we were doing with all the telescopes.  LOL!  We all ignored him and he eventually rode off.  One final story is from June 1992.  Our same imaging group was camped on top of Palomar Mountain.  It was such a beautiful warm night I decided to sleep outside in a chase lounge camp chair. It was early dawn just before sunrise when I heard a low rumble in the distance.  I thought it was a plane but about 5 seconds later the ground shook and it was a earthquake!  I had actually heard the quake coming.  It ended up being mag 7.3 near Landers.  A few hours later the mag 6.5 Big Bear quake was also felt.         
 
Chris
 

 

----- Original Message -----
From: Stuart <stuart.j.heggie@...>
Reply-To: <main@ap-ug.groups.io>
To: <main@ap-ug.groups.io>
Sent: 11/28/2021 12:59:23 PM
Subject: Re: [ap-ug] Funny Stories

Great story Rolando! I will share one I "might" have shared long ago:

Doing a manually guided shot on film, my cats are outside with me. My tabby is under the tripod bumping into me and everything else so I shoo her away, finish the shot then look up to see that she's a few feet away eating an apple on the ground. I get up, go over to pick her up and take her into the house. I then mentally comment "Odd, her white markings are on her chest not her back. Whoa!!" I literally had my hands a few inches from the skunk's body to pick it up when I realized who had been bumping around under my tripod and through my legs!


On Sun, 28 Nov 2021 at 12:04, Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...> wrote:
Great stories.

I too have critters that accompany me in the AP observatory. Besides the mice and chipmunks who like to climb up the inside of the telescope piers, I have a bunch of coyotes in the field behind the observatory. Whenever there is an ambulance or police car with sirens on the nearby highway the coyotes will howl and yip along with them. I have howled along with them, but they don't seem impressed with my songs.

One day I was working inside my observatory when I was startled by a loud bang on the roof. I checked outside but saw nothing. A minute later there was another bang followed by another. I rushed outside and saw a big crow at the peak of the roof dropping a fairly large stone onto the roof and was watching it roll down the steel panels, and obviously quite amused.

Rolando

-----Original Message-----
From: Jay Freeman via groups.io <Jay_Reynolds_Freeman=mac.com@groups.io>
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Cc: Jay Freeman <jay_reynolds_freeman@...>
Sent: Sun, Nov 28, 2021 2:08 am
Subject: Re: [ap-ug] Funny Stories

Not particularly about AP products, but perhaps entertaining ...

http://www.jayreynoldsfreeman.com/Aux/AstroPDFs/TTGBITN.text.pdf

http://www.jayreynoldsfreeman.com/Aux/AstroPDFs/Deliver.text.pdf

And you imagers may be amused by a few recollections of an evening lecture at the late, lamented Riverside Telescope Makers' Convention, some time about 1980. The topic was avoiding errors in photographic imaging of deep-sky objects, using a technology left over from before the Cretaceous / Tertiary asteroid strike, featuring something called "film".

Slides were projected. I particularly remember one called "The Blank Frame", which was further explained as a 1/125-th second exposure of M31, followed by 45 minutes of careful hand-guiding. Another was "The Mark Of Zorro", and there were several variants here, depending on whether it was the family cat or dog that had rubbed up against the tripod leg. And I think there was a completely transparent slide which was the result of a nice exposure of M13 after which the telescope operator had fallen asleep until shortly after sunrise.

Anyway, clear sky to you all ...

--  Jay Reynolds Freeman, Deep-Sky Weasel
---------------------
Jay_Reynolds_Freeman@...
http://JayReynoldsFreeman.com (personal web site)







Re: Funny Stories

 

the new definition of "last night my imaging sure stunk" ;)


On Sun, Nov 28, 2021 at 9:59 AM Stuart <stuart.j.heggie@...> wrote:
Great story Rolando! I will share one I "might" have shared long ago:

Doing a manually guided shot on film, my cats are outside with me. My tabby is under the tripod bumping into me and everything else so I shoo her away, finish the shot then look up to see that she's a few feet away eating an apple on the ground. I get up, go over to pick her up and take her into the house. I then mentally comment "Odd, her white markings are on her chest not her back. Whoa!!" I literally had my hands a few inches from the skunk's body to pick it up when I realized who had been bumping around under my tripod and through my legs!


On Sun, 28 Nov 2021 at 12:04, Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Great stories.

I too have critters that accompany me in the AP observatory. Besides the mice and chipmunks who like to climb up the inside of the telescope piers, I have a bunch of coyotes in the field behind the observatory. Whenever there is an ambulance or police car with sirens on the nearby highway the coyotes will howl and yip along with them. I have howled along with them, but they don't seem impressed with my songs.

One day I was working inside my observatory when I was startled by a loud bang on the roof. I checked outside but saw nothing. A minute later there was another bang followed by another. I rushed outside and saw a big crow at the peak of the roof dropping a fairly large stone onto the roof and was watching it roll down the steel panels, and obviously quite amused.

Rolando

-----Original Message-----
From: Jay Freeman via groups.io <Jay_Reynolds_Freeman=mac.com@groups.io>
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Cc: Jay Freeman <jay_reynolds_freeman@...>
Sent: Sun, Nov 28, 2021 2:08 am
Subject: Re: [ap-ug] Funny Stories

Not particularly about AP products, but perhaps entertaining ...

http://www.jayreynoldsfreeman.com/Aux/AstroPDFs/TTGBITN.text.pdf

http://www.jayreynoldsfreeman.com/Aux/AstroPDFs/Deliver.text.pdf

And you imagers may be amused by a few recollections of an evening lecture at the late, lamented Riverside Telescope Makers' Convention, some time about 1980. The topic was avoiding errors in photographic imaging of deep-sky objects, using a technology left over from before the Cretaceous / Tertiary asteroid strike, featuring something called "film".

Slides were projected. I particularly remember one called "The Blank Frame", which was further explained as a 1/125-th second exposure of M31, followed by 45 minutes of careful hand-guiding. Another was "The Mark Of Zorro", and there were several variants here, depending on whether it was the family cat or dog that had rubbed up against the tripod leg. And I think there was a completely transparent slide which was the result of a nice exposure of M13 after which the telescope operator had fallen asleep until shortly after sunrise.

Anyway, clear sky to you all ...

--  Jay Reynolds Freeman, Deep-Sky Weasel
---------------------
Jay_Reynolds_Freeman@...
http://JayReynoldsFreeman.com (personal web site)








--
Brian 



Brian Valente


Re: Funny Stories

Roland Christen
 

Stuck out tongue closed eyes Great story!

Rolando

-----Original Message-----
From: Stuart <stuart.j.heggie@...>
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Sent: Sun, Nov 28, 2021 11:59 am
Subject: Re: [ap-ug] Funny Stories

Great story Rolando! I will share one I "might" have shared long ago:

Doing a manually guided shot on film, my cats are outside with me. My tabby is under the tripod bumping into me and everything else so I shoo her away, finish the shot then look up to see that she's a few feet away eating an apple on the ground. I get up, go over to pick her up and take her into the house. I then mentally comment "Odd, her white markings are on her chest not her back. Whoa!!" I literally had my hands a few inches from the skunk's body to pick it up when I realized who had been bumping around under my tripod and through my legs!


On Sun, 28 Nov 2021 at 12:04, Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Great stories.

I too have critters that accompany me in the AP observatory. Besides the mice and chipmunks who like to climb up the inside of the telescope piers, I have a bunch of coyotes in the field behind the observatory. Whenever there is an ambulance or police car with sirens on the nearby highway the coyotes will howl and yip along with them. I have howled along with them, but they don't seem impressed with my songs.

One day I was working inside my observatory when I was startled by a loud bang on the roof. I checked outside but saw nothing. A minute later there was another bang followed by another. I rushed outside and saw a big crow at the peak of the roof dropping a fairly large stone onto the roof and was watching it roll down the steel panels, and obviously quite amused.

Rolando

-----Original Message-----
From: Jay Freeman via groups.io <Jay_Reynolds_Freeman=mac.com@groups.io>
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Cc: Jay Freeman <jay_reynolds_freeman@...>
Sent: Sun, Nov 28, 2021 2:08 am
Subject: Re: [ap-ug] Funny Stories

Not particularly about AP products, but perhaps entertaining ...

http://www.jayreynoldsfreeman.com/Aux/AstroPDFs/TTGBITN.text.pdf

http://www.jayreynoldsfreeman.com/Aux/AstroPDFs/Deliver.text.pdf

And you imagers may be amused by a few recollections of an evening lecture at the late, lamented Riverside Telescope Makers' Convention, some time about 1980. The topic was avoiding errors in photographic imaging of deep-sky objects, using a technology left over from before the Cretaceous / Tertiary asteroid strike, featuring something called "film".

Slides were projected. I particularly remember one called "The Blank Frame", which was further explained as a 1/125-th second exposure of M31, followed by 45 minutes of careful hand-guiding. Another was "The Mark Of Zorro", and there were several variants here, depending on whether it was the family cat or dog that had rubbed up against the tripod leg. And I think there was a completely transparent slide which was the result of a nice exposure of M13 after which the telescope operator had fallen asleep until shortly after sunrise.

Anyway, clear sky to you all ...

--  Jay Reynolds Freeman, Deep-Sky Weasel
---------------------
Jay_Reynolds_Freeman@...
http://JayReynoldsFreeman.com (personal web site)






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