Date   

Re: Thanksgiving Mars

dvjbaja
 

Thanks for the thought.  I'm away of Facebook for now. 


Re: Thanksgiving Mars

Richard S. Wright Jr.
 

Very fine work there.

Richard


On Dec 2, 2022, at 11:59 AM, dvjbaja <jpgleasonid@...> wrote:

Here are a few snaps of Mars taken during the Thanksgiving week.   All done with the Mak 10 at f/22 with Tak extender and Player One Mars-C camera.  The north polar cloud cap is quite interesting.  

jg <MARS composite AP.jpg>


Re: Thanksgiving Mars

 

John those are beautiful!

I don't see you posting much in the planetary fb group, get over there we need some inspiring Mars images :)

On Fri, Dec 2, 2022 at 8:59 AM dvjbaja <jpgleasonid@...> wrote:
Here are a few snaps of Mars taken during the Thanksgiving week.   All done with the Mak 10 at f/22 with Tak extender and Player One Mars-C camera.  The north polar cloud cap is quite interesting.  

jg




Re: Thanksgiving Mars

Emilio J. Robau, P.E.
 

Super Cool


Re: Thanksgiving Mars

Karen Christen
 

Really nice, John.

Karen

AP

 

From: main@ap-ug.groups.io <main@ap-ug.groups.io> On Behalf Of dvjbaja
Sent: Friday, December 2, 2022 10:59 AM
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Subject: [ap-ug] Thanksgiving Mars

 

Here are a few snaps of Mars taken during the Thanksgiving week.   All done with the Mak 10 at f/22 with Tak extender and Player One Mars-C camera.  The north polar cloud cap is quite interesting.  

jg


Re: Thanksgiving Mars

Roland Christen
 

Those are great shots.

Roland

-----Original Message-----
From: dvjbaja <jpgleasonid@...>
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Sent: Fri, Dec 2, 2022 10:59 am
Subject: [ap-ug] Thanksgiving Mars

Here are a few snaps of Mars taken during the Thanksgiving week.   All done with the Mak 10 at f/22 with Tak extender and Player One Mars-C camera.  The north polar cloud cap is quite interesting.  

jg


Thanksgiving Mars

dvjbaja
 

Here are a few snaps of Mars taken during the Thanksgiving week.   All done with the Mak 10 at f/22 with Tak extender and Player One Mars-C camera.  The north polar cloud cap is quite interesting.  

jg


Re: Venting an observatory

Astrobob
 

My ROR has 2X6 rafters fully covered by 1/4" plywood. Attached to that is bright silver aluminum roofing. The exterior walls are covered with light colored siding. The bottom of the 16" square pier has a space in the floor (to prevent vibrations) that has screening to prevent critters from getting in. The perimeter of the roof has a one-inch space all around to ventilate rising heat. The whole observatory acts like a chimney when closed. I rarely see the temperature over 80 during the hottest days. In the spring, I spray the interior perimeter of the roof with a house friendly bug killer. I have no trouble with rain or snow except for brushing it off the roof. I built the observatory in 2000. I've never had critters or a leak except (on two occasions) a 3-foot Rat snake (excellent climbers) that I put out the door. They live under my observatory and they're not poisonous. They are welcome! I've never seen a mouse in the observatory in 22 years.

Bob


Re: Mauna Loa eruption

ROBERT WYNNE
 

Think it's due the movement of the Pacific plate over the hot spot. The hot spot remains in one spot while the Pacific plate advances NNW over time leaving a trail of  islands. I believe the hot spot is located in the central Pacific due the thinness of the earth's crust near the center of the Pacific ocean. -Best, Robert

On 12/01/2022 7:17 PM M Hambrick <mhambrick563@...> wrote:


My recollection of the geology of the Hawaiian Islands is that the hot spot that formed the islands has moved from northwest to southeast over the past thousands of years, making Kauai the oldest, and the Big Island the newest of the main islands. The good news in this is that Roland and Marj's house in the northwest corner of the island is in a pretty good spot.

Mike


Re: Mauna Loa eruption

M Hambrick
 

My recollection of the geology of the Hawaiian Islands is that the hot spot that formed the islands has moved from northwest to southeast over the past thousands of years, making Kauai the oldest, and the Big Island the newest of the main islands. The good news in this is that Roland and Marj's house in the northwest corner of the island is in a pretty good spot.

Mike


Re: Mauna Loa eruption

Pete Lardizabal
 

Thanks for the link Shawn!

Amazing photos and videos!

😎

Pete

On Dec 1, 2022, at 7:05 PM, Shawn Quinn <quinnfamily@...> wrote:

I've climbed Mauna Loa twice.  The last time I was on the Big Island was in May 2018 and I was able to see the 200 ft lava fountains in Leilani Estates.  It was quite an experience.  The USGS maintains excellent up to date information on the on-going eruption:

https://www.usgs.gov/volcanoes/mauna-loa

There are recent videos, images, maps, and status reports.

Shawn  

Color map of eruption


Re: Mauna Loa eruption

Shawn Quinn
 

I've climbed Mauna Loa twice.  The last time I was on the Big Island was in May 2018 and I was able to see the 200 ft lava fountains in Leilani Estates.  It was quite an experience.  The USGS maintains excellent up to date information on the on-going eruption:

https://www.usgs.gov/volcanoes/mauna-loa

There are recent videos, images, maps, and status reports.

Shawn  

Color map of eruption


Re: Venting an observatory

Jeff B
 

One thing I learned with roll off roofs is that when I really insulate the walls, ceiling and door, the interior temperature will always track below, sometimes well below,ambient, right up until sunset.  The 22' x 32' ROR we house the big 11" achromat in tracks a good 5-6 degrees F under ambient.  Its wall and ceiling are super insulated, running clearances low.  My recent 13' x 13' ROR for my personal big refractor runs a solid 3-4 degrees lower than ambient with R11 in the walls and R20 in the "attic".  Both observatories have vents in their attics.

I have found it a tremendous advantage to have both scopes, particularly my big LZOS triplet, at or a little below ambient temperature when deployed, preferably the later.  We can use high powers immediately, especially during that really nice window from just before sunset to about an hour after sunset when the upper atmosphere is really calm.  Plus, after that, the scopes are much better positioned to track the falling ambient temperature.  No boiling thermal soups in the out of focus images!

Jeff

On Thu, Dec 1, 2022 at 7:55 AM Dean S <dean@...> wrote:
My south wall gets very warm from the sun during the summer.   I hang a solar shade on the wall and it cuts the heat tremendously.   Lasts about 5 years before it needs replaced.  image0.png


On Dec 1, 2022, at 4:44 AM, ROBERT WYNNE <robert-wynne@...> wrote:


I think you should consider solar powered attic fans. They are quite effective. I have several on my home and no longer have a strata of warm air hugging the ceiling. BTW That's quite a set up you have there. -Best, Robert
On 11/30/2022 9:08 PM Eric Claeys <astroeric@...> wrote:


Thanks Robert.  I was hoping to have positive pressure.  The ambient rarely gets above 85 F - the observatory heats up (probably) due to the color.  I'd like to get as cool as possible given the fans I have.  I considered 120v fans but feel it's too dangerous since I'll need electrical contacts so the fans get power only when the roof is closed.  I don't want exposed 120v contacts.
Air conditioning is too costly, too complex, and requires more maintenance so I prefer to stay away from that.
I've considered pushing hot air out and adding a filtered vent near the floor.  I assume I'd want the vent on the opposite side from the fans?  Adding a floor vent would be a backup if the current solution isn't enough.

Rolando, I'll need to check with the community covenants to see if I can have a white roof (it's in New Mexico Skies Enclave, next door to Mike Rice's place).  I hesitate to paint anything though (the current siding came colored) since that adds to maintenance. 

<Observatory.png>


Re: Guide to fixing tilt and spacing with objective analysis- Word Document Version

Chris White
 

You're welcome. My main goal with all of this is to share what I have learned through many hours of testing, so that people have a path forward to improve their stars. Happy it could be useful. 


Re: Mauna Loa eruption

 

Yes, that would be a great problem, indeed.

 

Clear Skies,

Marj Christen

Astro-Physics

11250 Forest Hills Road

Machesney Park, IL 61115

Phone: 815-282-1513

www.astro-physics.com
Video Tutorials: https://www.youtube.com/astrophysicscorp 

 

From: main@ap-ug.groups.io <main@ap-ug.groups.io> On Behalf Of Donald Rudny
Sent: Wednesday, November 30, 2022 11:14 PM
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-ug] Mauna Loa eruption

 

Just want to point out to all that although the eruption is exciting to see, the situation here is very problematic because of the fact that if the flow closes off Inouye Highway (Saddle Road), many will be cut off from their jobs in Kona if they live in the Hilo area.  They can still access Kona, but at a great inconvenience and expense.  Let’s hope this stops soon before that happens.  Attached is a map of the recent location of the flow.  Right now it’s about 3.5 mi from Saddle Rd.

 

Don Rudny

P.O. Box 106

Pepeekeo, HI 96783-0106

 

312-209-5870



On Nov 30, 2022, at 4:52 PM, Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...> wrote:



For those who are interested,

 

The Mauna Loa eruption on Hawaii Island is continuing and lava is now flowing down the mountain to the saddle between Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea. The telescopes on Mauna Kea are not in any danger but if the lava continues to flow it may cut across the major highway that goes to Hilo. The observatories can still be reached from Weimea which is to the north and west. Lava is flowing east down the mountain.

 

Our home and observatory is far away from this activity and would never be impacted by any of the volcanoes on the island. Right now the access road to the USGS climate observatory at the 11,000 ft level on Mauna Loa has been over-run by lava, so this facility is now not accessible. The observatory has not been impacted by lava at this time.

 

This is the second major eruption on the island in the last 5 years, Kilauea having spread lava over the south-east of the island and destroying a large number of homes in its path. The Mauna Loa eruption is not heading towards any communities, it's impacting a wild area of the land between the two large mountains. According to reports, the mountain is putting on quite a show, especially at night, and can be seen from all parts of the island. We were there only 2 weeks ago and normally we would have made our annual trip this week, but things didn't work out for us. Sure would have liked to see this spectacle.

 

Rolando

 

 

dummyfile.0.part


Re: Guide to fixing tilt and spacing with objective analysis- Word Document Version

Emilio J. Robau, P.E.
 

Yes,

Thanks Chris for the work.  Last night I FINALLY dialed in my Newtonian.   It is not dialed in like you or Linwood's presentations, but is good enough for me at this point.  No less than five times I considered dismantling everything and selling the parts.  Building a simple Newtonian astrograph was very hard for me.   I finally have reasonable stars across only an APS-C frame.  The scope is now a keeper.  I find NINA's aberration inspection to be pretty good for curvature but less reliable for tilt.  I have a hard time getting stable readings.   Paul is correct it takes a long long time to get everything aligned.   I think that once you do it you get the experience to go forward and do it again a lot faster.  


Re: Guide to fixing tilt and spacing with objective analysis- Word Document Version

pjaprivat@...
 

Thanks Chris for this and all your help to so many in the astro community on this topic. This beats re-reading all the posts on CN and Astrobin. I replaced my TEC FRC with the TEC FF (no longer available from TEC), adjusted tilt with the octopi and now have round stars in all corners with my QHY600M. Only took me a year to get here!

Paul


Re: Venting an observatory

Dean S
 

My south wall gets very warm from the sun during the summer.   I hang a solar shade on the wall and it cuts the heat tremendously.   Lasts about 5 years before it needs replaced.  image0.png


On Dec 1, 2022, at 4:44 AM, ROBERT WYNNE <robert-wynne@...> wrote:


I think you should consider solar powered attic fans. They are quite effective. I have several on my home and no longer have a strata of warm air hugging the ceiling. BTW That's quite a set up you have there. -Best, Robert
On 11/30/2022 9:08 PM Eric Claeys <astroeric@...> wrote:


Thanks Robert.  I was hoping to have positive pressure.  The ambient rarely gets above 85 F - the observatory heats up (probably) due to the color.  I'd like to get as cool as possible given the fans I have.  I considered 120v fans but feel it's too dangerous since I'll need electrical contacts so the fans get power only when the roof is closed.  I don't want exposed 120v contacts.
Air conditioning is too costly, too complex, and requires more maintenance so I prefer to stay away from that.
I've considered pushing hot air out and adding a filtered vent near the floor.  I assume I'd want the vent on the opposite side from the fans?  Adding a floor vent would be a backup if the current solution isn't enough.

Rolando, I'll need to check with the community covenants to see if I can have a white roof (it's in New Mexico Skies Enclave, next door to Mike Rice's place).  I hesitate to paint anything though (the current siding came colored) since that adds to maintenance. 

<Observatory.png>


Re: Venting an observatory

weems@...
 

That may just be a sound absorbing layer, to reduce drumming in the rain. Insulation isn’t the best solution, but if painting the roof isn’t an option, it will help reduce solar gain and lower the load on the fans. Since the roof rolls off, it shouldn’t affect seeing. It will slow radiative cooling after the sun goes down, so may necessitate opening earlier. 

Chip 


Re: Venting an observatory

ROBERT WYNNE
 

I second painting the roof white. -Best, Robert

On 12/01/2022 12:36 AM Christopher Erickson <christopher.k.erickson@...> wrote:


Preserving local seeing is behind many details related to ventilation.

Insulation isn't an ideal solution. You want your observatory parts to have about the same thermal inertia as your environment.

Have a reversible fan mounted low on the observatory. Pulls air in during the day and pushes hot air out of a passive vent at the high point of the observatory. Reverse the fan direction at night. Little fans are mostly useless.

A filter box might be a good thing when pulling air into the observatory.

A reflective roof is VERY desirable. There are special paints available.

Heat can be very hard on lubrications in mounts and focusers. It can age many things quickly. Things like O-rings, gaskets, plastic, etc. It will also accelerate oxidation, contamination and corrosion.

Having two or more reversible fans is way, way better than having just one fan. Redundancy. Avoiding SPoF's (Single Point of Failure.)


-Christopher Erickson
Observatory engineer
Waikoloa, HI 96738
www.summitkinetics.com
   

On Wed, Nov 30, 2022, 8:01 PM Eric Claeys <AstroEric@...> wrote:
Thanks Chip. I'm pretty sure the bottom of the roof is already insulated, at least it has something that looks like there's foam in it.  I've never gotten up there to check it out though.



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